Crashaw


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Crashaw

Richard. 1613--49, English religious poet, noted esp for the Steps to the Temple (1646)
References in periodicals archive ?
(48) Richard Crashaw, 'The Flaming Heart Upon the Book and Picture of the seraphicall saint Teresa, (As She Is Usually Expressed with a Seraphim biside her)', in Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris: Peter Targa, 1652), p.
My first paper, on Crashaw & Herbert, was badly written, I thought, but Blunden said he saw no falling off in skill, and that if anything my exegesis had improved.
The combination of canonical and noncanonical material is stimulating and offers a wide-ranging canvas: plays by Shakespeare, songbooks by Campion, masques for schoolgirls, political tracts, ballads, poems by Crashaw, and catches performed by men, to name just a few.
The opening conceit--which is surely the right word for the observations on 'the very reverse of amber'--may be more fully explained than one would expect from Donne, Cowley, Vaughan, or Crashaw, but it is dense and complicated, even perverse in what it sets up and then sets askew.
Kaufman isolates examples in sermons by reformist preachers William Perkins and William Crashaw. He also notes that there would have been conformist sermons "complaining about overzealous, hypocritical puritan moralists" (76).
This classical image of the son feeding blood to his mother (an image framed by the figure of a nursing infant) reappears in a work adored by Smith: Richard Crashaw's Divine Epigrams, in which he distills various scriptural excerpts and renders them in pithy, often fantastically strange lyrics.
A passion project more than a decade in the making for director Vincent Crashaw, this uneven arthouse- and VOD-bound indie--released unrated, but suitable for teens--lies somewhere between indignant expose and unusually tasteful exploitation pic, with shower scenes and sweaty young delinquents aplenty.
She discusses textual immanence in The Temple, Edward Taylor's "Menstruous Cloth," metaphor and resistance in John Donne, Richard Crashaw, and immanent textualities in a a postsacramental world.
Crashaw, of course, is fully established as representing the Roman Catholic baroque in the Italianate or Spanish mode.
Traditional masculine norms have been linked to a number of risk outcomes including: alcohol use (Capraro, 2000; Pleck & O'Donnell, 2001), risky and aggressive driving (Lupton, 2004), criminal activity (Bunton, Crashaw, & Green, 2004), risky health behaviours (Bunton, Crashaw, & Green, 2004; Courtenay, 1998, 2000; Mahalik, Bums, & Syzdek, 2007), heterosexual risk behaviours (Blackbeard & Lindegger, 2007; Miller, 2008; Govender, 2011), interpersonal violence (Archer, Holloway, & McLoughlin, 1995; Hammock & Richardson, 1992; Miller, 2008; Truman, Tokar, & Fischer, 1996) and bodily demonstrations of toughness (Blackbeard & Lindegger, 2007; Mahalik, Bums, & Syzdek, 2007; Miller, 2008).
Waller fares far better, as might be expected, with Petrarchan courtly love poetry, whose parallels with Virgin worship have long been noted; or with Baroque poets such as Crashaw, whose intensity and extravagance are far closer to the tenor of medieval devotion.