crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism

[‚kras·ə¦lā·shən ¦as·əd mə′tab·ə‚liz·əm]
(botany)
A type of photosynthesis exhibited by many succulent plants in which carbon dioxide is taken up and stored during the night to allow the stomata to remain closed during the daytime, decreasing water loss. Abbreviated CAM.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[41] Smith, J.A.C., Marigo, G., Luettge, U., and Ball, E., 1982, "Adenine-nucleotide levels during crassulacean acid metabolism and the energetics of malate accumulation in Kalanchoe tubiflora," Plant Sci.
Crassulacean acid metabolism: a re-appraisal of physiological plasticity in form and function.
Evidence of crassulacean acid metabolism in two North American isoetids.
Silvera K, Santiago LS, Winter K (2005) Distribution of crassulacean acid metabolism in orchids of Panama: evidence of selection for weak and strong modes.
Also, Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) may be induced by drought in facultative plants and is generally considered an adaptive response to water deficit because its operation increases water use efficiency, i.e.
Cactus pear is a xerophile plant and its physiology is characterized by the photosynthetic process called Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and, under stress conditions, water is saved due to stomatal closure during the day and opening during the night with C[O.sub.2] fixation.
Depending on a form of photosynthesis, known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), plants thrive in drylands by keeping their stomata, or pores, shut during the day to conserve water and open at night to collect carbon dioxide.
Agave species assembled an important group of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants with remarkable tolerance to heat and drought stresses in arid regions [1].
The Opuntioid cacti represent the most spectacular species of succulent plants, which are characterized by a shallow root system that permits rapid water uptake; a thick, waxy cuticle that prevents excessive water loss; and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), an alternative photosynthetic pathway, that allows plants to uptake atmospheric C[O.sub.2] at night when water loss is minimized [2].
In the desert, where water is in short supply, some plants use a different network of chemical reactions to make energy: crassulacean acid metabolism, or CAM.