Crenellation

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Related to Crenellations: Battlements, merlons, Machicolations

Crenellation

A pattern of repeated depressed openings in a fortification parapet wall.

crenellation

crenellation
See battlement.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Today, modern roads snake through the mountains to the most remote villages, schools are everywhere, health care is among the best in the world, and Muscat gleams with elegant white buildings with a style which borrows from India as well as from the crenellations and battlements of Oman's own ancient forts.
But there is no doubting the theme at Bunkers Hill House, notable at first glance for its big quatrefoil motifs within the stonework and the dramatic crenellations.
fibrous crenellations of the reef, which if you look close are formed
The weeping of crenellations, the smile and the vine,
After some scrutiny, we can just make out crenellations on the crest of a hill.
The historic town, once famous for its shoe-making industries, is dominated by a massive mediaeval fortress, complete with crenellations and 13 immense towers which rank amongst the largest in Europe.
This assumption can already be seen in David Jee's frontispiece engraving to Sharp, Dissertation (1825), which gives a lively side-on view of Christ before Pilate at Coventry (see fig 1), and has been so influential that its decorative crenellations were faithfully reproduced on the frame of the Balaam and Balaak wagon used in the Durham Medieval Theatre Co production at Chester in 1983.
Its turrets and crenellations appear to be grafted on to a steep ethereal promontory while its stone walls curve elegantly round the crown of the hill.
Though I long to slow down, draw the exact outline of each twisting juniper branch, get lost in the crenellations of the juniper foliage and the sagebrush's feathery fans, this is about larger unities.
The Great Wall at Mutianyu features crenellations, finely curved eaves, decorative gables with animal statues, and tablets bearing calligraphy.
Blacksmith Stephen Mather, 40, of nearby Holbourn Smithy, used more than two tonnes of metal to handcraft longbows, billhooks, arrows, the Flodden Cross, an English rose crest, flag, Lamb of God emblems, the contours of the hills where the battle took place and the crenellations of Barmoor Castle.