Creole house

Creole house

Creole house
A house developed by the Creoles (i.e., French-speaking persons of European ancestry born in the Gulf Coast or environs in the early 18th century) designed to provide reasonable comfort under the local conditions of high temperature and high humidity; usually rectangular in plan, with one or two rooms, a garret overhead; a bonnet roof or a roof having a single slope on each side of a central ridge; usually a raised house surrounded (or partially surrounded) by a full-length porch along one or both sides of the house; the rooms are entered through French doors from the porch. The floor on which the family lived was raised well above ground level to improve the air circulation. Compare with Cajun cottage.
References in periodicals archive ?
One fine old Creole house, Eureka, is set against the dramatic backdrop of the Moka mountains, built 200 years ago from local timbers.
Simple Creole houses, with the additions of massive Greek Revival columns, curved stairs, semi-detached wings, reflected the owner's wealth.
Contract notice: Operating market, management and maintenance of public lighting, sports lighting creole houses and monuments and other festive lighting