Crepe ring

Crepe ring

(krayp) See Saturn's rings.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Crepe ring

[′krāp ‚riŋ]
(astronomy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is extremely faint, much fainter than the Crepe Ring, which shines brightly in the 1.07 m, and its inner edge is undetectable, being lost in the strong contrast effect caused by the comparatively brilliant limb of Saturn.
In fact, in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was known as the "crepe ring" because of its supposed similarity to crepe paper.
The innermost ring visible in amateur scopes is the dusky C ring, also called the Crepe Ring. You might not see it, because it's sparse and hardly brighter than the dark sky.
(6.) Dobbins T and Sheehan W: Saturn's Enigmatic Crepe Ring. Sky and Telesc 96 (3): 116-121, 1998.
Ring C, also called the crepe ring, can be either difficult or easy to make out.
Not until latitude 39[degrees]would the inner edge of ring C (the crepe ring) be seen.
Without a filter, the gap between the interior of ring B and the globe is awash in a "noise" of purple haze that masks the faint "signal" of the crepe ring. Despite a modest reduction in image brightness, the crepe ring is visible at a glance in the ansae of the rings through all of the dielectric filters; the denser Wratten 12 filter doesn't fare as well in this respect.
During satellite transits, the tiny, bright disks of Io and Europa can be distinguished against the backdrop of Jupiter's zones, and Saturn's low-contrast belts and delicate crepe ring stand out more prominently at 280x in the Herschelian than at 180x in my 8-inch catadioptric Cassegrain.
This feature, he noted, was fainter than ring C (the so-called crepe ring, discovered in 1850) and seldom equally prominent in both ansae.
Ring C was independently discovered in November 1850 by Dawes in England and by William Cranch Bond and his son, George, at Harvard College Observatory ("Saturn's Enigmatic Crepe Ring" S&T, September 1998, page 116).
Turning to Saturn, the crepe ring was easier to see (though still subtle) in the Maksutov than in the 4-inch apo, but faint moons appeared similar in both scopes.