Cressida

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Cressida,

in astronomy, one of the natural satellites, or moons, of UranusUranus
, in astronomy, 7th planet from the sun, at a mean distance of 1.78 billion mi (2.87 billion km), with an orbit lying between those of Saturn and Neptune; its period of revolution is slightly more than 84 years.
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Cressida,

in medieval romance: see Troilus and CressidaTroilus and Cressida
, a medieval romance distantly related to characters in Greek legend. Troilus, a Trojan prince (son of Priam and Hecuba), fell in love with Cressida (Chryseis), daughter of Calchas.
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Cressida

(kress -ă-dă) A small satellite of Uranus, discovered in 1986. See Uranus' satellites; Table 2, backmatter.

Cressida

[′kres·əd·ə]
(astronomy)
A satellite of Uranus orbiting at a mean distance of 38,380 miles (61,770 kilometers) with a period of 11 hours 9 minutes, and with a diameter of about 41 miles (66 kilometers).

Cressida

unfaithful mistress of Troilus; byword for unfaithfulness. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida]
References in periodicals archive ?
Tell me Apollo, for thy Daphne's love, What Cressid is, what Pandar, and what we: Her bed is India, there she lies, a pearl; Between our Ilium and where she resides Let it be called the wild and wand'ring flood, Ourself the merchant and this sailing Pandar Our doubtful hope, our convoy and our bark.
Pandarus declares that if the lovers prove false, then 'let all constant men be Troiluses, all false women Cressids, and all brokers-between Pandars' (3.
Throughout Turbervile's volume, the paradigm of Cressid and her fault is repeatedly invoked as the likely parallel for any mistress:
For his part, Troilus must acknowledge another inevitable truth: "I cannot come to Cressid but by Pandar", affirms the prince:
Tell me, Apollo, for thy Daphne's love, What Cressid is, what Pandar, and what we?
Few words to fair faith--Troilus shall be such to Cressid as what envy can say worst shall be a mock for his truth; and what truth can speak truest, not truer than Troilus.
Most questions raised in this paper concern identity: "What Cressid is, what Pandar and what we?
It is my impression that when Weimann finds a disjunction between authorities, in the sense of unity, identity, or civil power within the play world (as when Cressid is perceived by Troilus as being "Diomed's Cressida," rather than his), he perceives it as a disjunction between signifier and signified.
Enter CRESSIDA] TROILUS Cressid comes forth to him.