Creusa


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Related to Creusa: Anchises, Ascanius, Helenus

Creusa

(krēo͞o`sə), in Greek mythology. 1 Daughter of Erechtheus and wife of Xuthus. Her sons, Achaeus by Xuthus, and Ion by Xuthus or Apollo, are the ancestors of the Achaeans and the Ionians. 2 Princess of Corinth: see JasonJason,
in Greek mythology, son of Aeson. When Pelias usurped the throne of Iolcus and killed (or imprisoned) Aeson and most of his descendants, Jason was smuggled off to the centaur Chiron, who reared him secretly on Mt. Pelion.
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 and MedeaMedea
, in Greek mythology, princess of Colchis, skilled in magic and sorcery. She fell in love with Jason and helped him, against the will of her father, Aeëtes, to obtain the Golden Fleece.
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. 3 Daughter of Priam and wife of Aeneas. She died fleeing from Troy.

Creusa

raped by Apollo; bore Janus. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 68]
See: Rape
References in periodicals archive ?
(16) En este dialogo se vuelve a hacer referencia al tema de la castidad, para destacar su falta en Creusa en clara oposicion al personaje de Florisenda.
Ion provides us with another tragedy in which reproach is directed at apparent Apollonian malfeasance (in this case, by Ion and Creusa).
(16) According to Vossius, it is due to all the excitement in the middle of the drama caused by the description of the gruesome deaths of Creusa and Creon that Seneca is forced to explicitly stage how Medea slays both her sons.
While h is often observed that Marlowe has Aeneas fail to save three women (Creusa, Cassandra, and Polyxena) in a row--thus building on the martial inadequacy of Virgil's Aeneas, who stands "unmanned" (44) after witnessing the murder of the patriarch Priam--Marlowe significantly deletes the extremely moving encounter between Aeneas and the ghost of Creusa in Virgil.
In the second part, for example, Medea, the well-known mythical figure, kills the princess Creusa by means of a poisoned dress simply because of her desire to take revenge on Jason who left her to marry the princess.
The example, drawn from the Greek tragedy Ion, discusses how Creusa's cry calls the god Apollo to acknowledge an injustice he has committed against her and about which he has remained silent.