care

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Related to Critical care: Critical Care Medicine, critical care unit

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
The Welsh Government claims to 'lead the way in the UK' on organ donation, changes the respected laws on 'consent', harangues the public to give organs - but fails to provide essential critical care beds.
Critical care provides specialist support for patients with acute lifethreatening injuries and illnesses.
Factors such as growing government support, increasing private sector investment, rising geriatric population, growing incidence and prevalence of respiratory and chronic diseases, and developing healthcare infrastructure are propelling the growth of the Indian critical care devices market.
The committee plans to develop some form of workforce register/database, which accurately reflects the true nature of critical care nursing in New Zealand.
The Delivery Plan requires health boards to deliver effective ward-based care and timely admissions and discharge to and from critical care units.
The most frequently occurring morally distressing situation for critical care nurses is that in which the patient's family wants to continue aggressive medical treatment when the nurse does not think it will be of benefit to the patient (Elpern, Covert, & Kleinpell, 2005; Gutierrez, 2005; Hamric & Blackhall, 2007; McClendon & Buckner, 2007; Sawatzky, 1996).
The committee will ensure that an evidence- based safe practice is delivered across all HMC critical care units.
Connect: The World of Critical Care Nursing is the official journal of the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses and is published in association with the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations.
At a minimum, it should facilitate additional communication between the ABEM and the two other boards that currently certify in adult critical care medicine, the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Anesthesiology, said Dr.
It is a great honour for us to welcome the board and delegates from the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses to the 2007 Congress.
One of the fathers of modern critical care, Martin Holmdahl, developed a system with the aid of his head nurse in Uppsala, Sweden, whereby no patient requiring ventilator support was ever left without knowing that a person was present.
No one had ever tried to introduce this technology into critical care medicine before.

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