Crocodilia

(redirected from Crocodilians)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Crocodilia

[′kräk·ə¦dil· ē·ə]
(vertebrate zoology)
An order of the class Reptilia which is composed of large, voracious, aquatic species, including the alligators, caimans, crocodiles, and gavials.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The International Union for the Conservation of Nature predicted the wild Chinese alligator as being the most endangered among 23 crocodilian species and The Convention was held in international trade of world endangered species and regarded Chinese alligator as Accessory I endangered species (Chen et al., 2003).
Living crocodilians range from diminutive forest dwellers to behemoths that eat wildebeests, bison, and, occasionally, people.
Crocodilians are a treasure trove of adaptations that can help us understand the form, function and evolution of many animals."
Young and adult crocodilians present marked vocal differences related to ontogenetic variations.
Crocodilians are considered "keystone species" in that they maintain the structure of an ecosystem, including nutrient recycling.
The gharial is one of the three crocodilians, apart from the mugger and saltwater crocodile.
The theft at Bendrick Rock was of a footprint belonging to a Teleosaurus - a type of crocodile that grew to almost 10ft long which, unlike modern crocodilians, lived in the open ocean.