Croesus


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Croesus

(krē`səs), d. c.547 B.C., king of Lydia (560–c.547 B.C.), noted for his great wealth. He was the son of Alyattes. He continued his father's policy of conquering the Ionian cities of Asia Minor, but on the whole he was friendly to the Greeks, and he is supposed to have given refuge to the Athenian statesman Solon. Threatened by Cyrus the GreatCyrus the Great
, d. 529 B.C., king of Persia, founder of the greatness of the Achaemenids and of the Persian Empire. According to Herodotus, he was the son of an Iranian noble, the elder Cambyses, and a Median princess, daughter of Astyages.
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 of Persia, Croesus allied himself with Amasis II of Egypt and Nabonidus of Babylonia against the Persian might, but the alliance was of no avail. Cyrus defeated and captured Croesus, and, according to Herodotus, Croesus cast himself upon a funeral pyre.

Croesus

 

Born 595 B.C.; died 546 B.C. Last ruler of Lydia, governing from 560 to 546.

Croesus expanded significantly the territory of the Kingdom of Lydia; he brought under his authority the Greek towns of Asia Minor (Ephesus, Miletus, and others) and conquered almost all of the western part of Asia Minor up to the Halys River. His wealth became proverbial, and many legends were created about him. Croesus was a Hellenophile; he sent generous gifts to Greek temples (Delphi and Ephesus) and sought to adapt Lydia to Greek culture. In a war with the Persian ruler Cyrus II he was defeated at Pteria (Cappadocia); the capital of Lydia, Sardis, was seized, and Croesus was taken prisoner (546). According to one version (Herodotus and the majority of ancient Greek historians), he was sentenced to be burned to death but was pardoned by Cyrus; according to another version (ancient Eastern cuneiform sources), he was executed.

REFERENCE

Dovatur, A. Povestvovatel’nyi i nauchnyi stil’ Gerodota. Leningrad, 1957.

Croesus

Lydian king; name became synonymous with riches. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 69]
See: Wealth

Croesus

died ?546 bc, the last king of Lydia (560--546), noted for his great wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet Solon would risk even further offense by telling Croesus that it is not he the King, but Cleobis and Biton, whom he ranks second in happiness after Tellus.
Similarly, Croesus slaughters three thousand animals "of each kind" (the kinds are not listed) and burns a great pyre of couches overlaid with gold and silver and other precious artifacts "expecting that thereby he would be likelier to win the favor of the god" (1.
The Lydian empire had fallen following the rule of Croesus, and Achaemenid rule had been established; however, when Herodotus was gathering traditions, the imperial power of Athens was opposed to Achaemenid domination of Lydia, Caria and Ionia.
We know a little bit aboutthe Croesus story, of course.
And of course the appearance of the monument is so decidedly Phrygian that if Croesus did indeed sponsor it.
Lord Albany Berrybender, rich as Croesus, takes the notion to travel the West and shoot buffalo.
Croesus, a Lydian by birth, son of Alyattes, tyrannos of those peoples who lived this side of the river Halys.
After entertaining Solon and hearing about his travels, Croesus asks him: "Who is the happiest man you have ever seen?
It is soft, pretty, and scarce, but in many ways quite useless, as the moral of Croesus tells us.
Radio-carbon dating confirms that the settlement is indeed from the Iron Age, which fits with the writing of Greek historian Herodotus, who claimed that Pteria was sacked by Croesus, king of Lydia, 50 years after it was founded.
Billy" Tauzin of Louisiana, are now pressing "reforms" that won't impede the nearly unbridled power of corporate managements to deplete 401(k) pension funds, entice the complicity of their outside auditors, and accord themselves compensation packages that would be the envy of Croesus.