Croesus


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Croesus

(krē`səs), d. c.547 B.C., king of Lydia (560–c.547 B.C.), noted for his great wealth. He was the son of Alyattes. He continued his father's policy of conquering the Ionian cities of Asia Minor, but on the whole he was friendly to the Greeks, and he is supposed to have given refuge to the Athenian statesman Solon. Threatened by Cyrus the GreatCyrus the Great
, d. 529 B.C., king of Persia, founder of the greatness of the Achaemenids and of the Persian Empire. According to Herodotus, he was the son of an Iranian noble, the elder Cambyses, and a Median princess, daughter of Astyages.
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 of Persia, Croesus allied himself with Amasis II of Egypt and Nabonidus of Babylonia against the Persian might, but the alliance was of no avail. Cyrus defeated and captured Croesus, and, according to Herodotus, Croesus cast himself upon a funeral pyre.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Croesus

 

Born 595 B.C.; died 546 B.C. Last ruler of Lydia, governing from 560 to 546.

Croesus expanded significantly the territory of the Kingdom of Lydia; he brought under his authority the Greek towns of Asia Minor (Ephesus, Miletus, and others) and conquered almost all of the western part of Asia Minor up to the Halys River. His wealth became proverbial, and many legends were created about him. Croesus was a Hellenophile; he sent generous gifts to Greek temples (Delphi and Ephesus) and sought to adapt Lydia to Greek culture. In a war with the Persian ruler Cyrus II he was defeated at Pteria (Cappadocia); the capital of Lydia, Sardis, was seized, and Croesus was taken prisoner (546). According to one version (Herodotus and the majority of ancient Greek historians), he was sentenced to be burned to death but was pardoned by Cyrus; according to another version (ancient Eastern cuneiform sources), he was executed.

REFERENCE

Dovatur, A. Povestvovatel’nyi i nauchnyi stil’ Gerodota. Leningrad, 1957.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Croesus

Lydian king; name became synonymous with riches. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 69]
See: Wealth
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Croesus

died ?546 bc, the last king of Lydia (560--546), noted for his great wealth
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To perform this work safely, lane reductions on the Imperial Highway off-ramp from the 105 Freeway and on Croesus Avenue will be in effect during work hours.
That was exactly what King Croesus was doing at that time.
"Croesus of Sardis and the Lydian Kingdom of Anatolia," in Civilizations of the Ancient Near East.
I refer here to the story of Solon, the great Athenian wise man and lawgiver, and his visit to Croesus, the Lydian king, as recounted in Book 1 of the Histories.
The ambiguity of divine communication, linked with the grip of fate, is emphasized in Herodotus's account of Cyrus, who--like Croesus, Cleomenes, and Cambyses--receives an accurate vision of his own demise but without discerning its true significance.
The result is a unique commentary on mid-century America, a nation energized by its pursuit of manifest destiny, invigorated by an emerging industrial age, stimulated by a religious awakening, and, above all, enriched by the Croesus of California gold.
The class of Kabil has 3 faces - Fir'aon (Pharaoh) and Haman (for power), Qarun (Korah) and Croesus (for wealth), and Balaam (for creed).
When the 2500-ton iron steamer Croesus, on its maiden voyage, arrived in Sydney on 20 April 1854, there were fears it could not safely return to England.
Yes, there is such an embarrassment of riches at Ballydoyle that it would make Croesus tug at his beard with envy, but the deployment of a Classicplaced Group 1 winner as nothing more than a hare beggars belief.
Amongst other "brothers" present that night were the Chancellor Gideon Osborne, and the rich as Croesus banker Nathaniel Rothschild.
Since long before Croesus, King of Lydia, came up with the game-changing idea of standardized "coinage," what governments have done and not done to structure, nudge, and put their thumbs on the scales has been decisively important for economic development.