cross-sectional study

(redirected from Cross sectional studies)
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cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cross sectional studies are the most popular type of descriptive studies.
In spite of these problems, cross sectional studies are highly beneficial in determining prevalence and enumerating risk factors for understanding disease etiology and generating hypotheses.
In this three-state study, the authors estimate the magnitudes of achievement gaps between English learner (EL) students and their non-EL peers, while avoiding typical caveats in cross sectional studies. The authors further compare the observed achievement gaps across three distinct dimensions (content areas, grades, and states) and report patterns of EL and non-EL achievement gaps within and across states.