cross-sectional study

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cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association between water intake, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease: a cross-sectional analysis of NHANES data.
Data source: The cross-sectional analysis comprised almost 3,000 patients.
In this study, researchers conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 745 participants between the ages of 65 and 90 years.
The report provides a cross-sectional analysis of all the above application segments with respect to the following countries:
This cross-sectional analysis included 23,168 men and non-pregnant women aged 20+ years from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
The authors note that the findings are based on a cross-sectional analysis and do not prove causation.
Coverage encompasses variables and colinearity, interaction models, multilevel models, models for panel data, time series cross-sectional analysis, spatial models, logistic regression, multinomial logit, Poisson regression, instrumental variables, structural equation modeling, and latent variable models.
The cross-sectional analysis included all patients presenting for a screening mammogram without clinical findings at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical College (NYPH-WCMC) in New York City.
Isolate the plated holes on the faulty net and perform a cross-sectional analysis of these holes.
A cross-sectional analysis was used to describe principal and teacher demographic characteristics.
For instance, Lakdawalla and colleagues, conducting a repeated cross-sectional analysis of only respondents in their first survey year, normalized the cross-sectional weight of each year by dividing the weight of each observation by the total sample weight from the relevant survey year.
001, respectively) among 250 patients in six African countries according to Kim CE Sigaloff and colleagues1 in a cross-sectional analysis of a multicentre prospective observational study published in the advance online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.