cross-sectional study

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Related to Cross-sectional design: Longitudinal design

cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Literature on research in foster care have highlighted methodological issues namely the cross-sectional design, comparison group, adult-centric design, sample size and sampling, standardized instrument, male caregivers are left out, and quantitative vs.
In addition, owing to the cross-sectional design, correlation only and not causation was reported.
Table 1 Review of Studies on Predictors for Organ Donation by African Americans Factors Identified as Study Predicting Participants' Study Focus and Design Willingness to Donate Cort & Cort A cross-sectional design; Participant agreement (2008) self-administered, with reason for organ 20-item questionnaire to donation (OR: 3.88, 95% examine the dependent CI: 2.32 to 6.46); or variable willingness to trust that the physician donate organs among a would attempt life- convenience sample of saving measures even if a Seventh Day Adventist donor (OR 1.28, 95% CI: college students (N= 334) 1.08 to 1.52).
Most research looking at personality profiles of martial artists used a cross-sectional design. A number of these studies have compared personality traits according to the performance level of martial artists (e.g., winning or losing a competition, earning a trophy or a medal) (e.g., McGowan and Miller, 1989; Richman and Rehberg, 1986).
The research adopted a cross-sectional design, using a structured questionnaire.
Eleven of these studies were randomised trials, 15 used a cross-sectional design, and 13 were cohort studies.
In many of the studies, despite the use of a cross-sectional design and the use of convenience sampling, the numbers obtained were relatively small.
Using a cross-sectional design, information was obtained from online questionnaires and on-site physical examinations from a sample of long-term users of multiple dietary supplements from a single dietary supplement supplier (Shaklee).
(6,13-19) The Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Changes in HIV Infection (FRAM) Study set out to examine rigorously, albeit with a cross-sectional design, the relative contributions of peripheral lipoatrophy and central fat accumulation to the phenotype of HIV-associated lipodystrophy.
Although this finding supports previous research on the effectiveness of consistent condom use to prevent HIV infection (33), our cross-sectional design renders it impossible to assess whether or not HIV was acquired when condom use consistency was assessed.