Crosstree

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Crosstree

 

a wood or steel structure serving to connect the parts of the vertical spars of a sailing ship, for instance, to connect the topgallant mast to the topmast. It is usually a frame made of longitudinal beams (trestletrees) and transverse beams (crosspieces). Crosstrees are used for fastening shrouds, other standing rigging, and parts of the cargo handling equipment, as well as for mounting crow’s nests.

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I sailed on schooners of that sort once and the only word we ever used for the spars to which the sails are bent was 'yards.' 'Crosstrees' were the lighter spars fixed near the lower masthead.
An understanding of the compositional process makes explicit the capacity of textual elements to coalesce and cross-validate, for example, the significance of the apparently erroneous use of the word "crosstree" in the "Proteus" episode of Ulysses (3.504):
Devices using Crosstrees Pod technology feature a polymer material constructed to control the delivery of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) bone cement to the fracture site.
Boulder, Colo.-based Crosstrees is developing and commercializing a product portfolio that addresses the demand for improved vertebral fracture treatment.
The jockey crashed into the overhead steel crosstrees and ripped his ear, but he is expected to be back on Wednesday.
10 The last sentence of "Proteus" presents an "unnatural" ship: "Moving through the air high spars of threemaster, her sails brailed up on the crosstrees, homing, upstream, silently moving, a silent ship." A ship with its sails brailed up cannot move upstream, yet this one does.
At last he was able to ride to Crosstrees and find Toby.
Please contact me by calling Mrs Terry Williams on 01473 730 540 or e-mailing d.t.Williams@amserve.net or writing to Crosstrees, Grovehill, Belstead, Ipswich.
The Great Lie by Myrrha Stanford-Smith The docks were still for once, the incessant hammering silenced as he rode, weary and saddle-sore through Deptford to Crosstrees, Fearghas cantering at his side.
Contact me by calling Terry Williams on 01473 730 540 or e-mailing d.t.Williams@amserve.net or writing to Crosstrees, Grovehill, Belstead, Ipswich.
Welcome to Crosstrees. We keep the place tidy for Sir Thomas and are to serve you, sir, if that is your liking.' | The Great Lie by Myrrha Stanford-Smith is published by Honno at PS8.99 www.honno.co.uk > CONTINUES TOMORROW