Cruck

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Cruck

One of a pair of large curved structural timbers, forming the wall posts and roof rafters of timber-framed houses; they are joined at the top of the frame where they support a ridge beam.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

crutch, cruck

One of a pair of naturally curved timbers that rise from the outer walls to support the ridge beam, each crutch being called a blade, 4; joined at the top and connected by one or two tie beams, the resulting arched frame forming the unit in the framework of old English houses or farm buildings; pairs of crutches were placed at approximately equal intervals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The medieval 'cruck frame' Lower Brockington manor house, built between 1380 and 1400 using limewashed estate wood
To look at the close studded timber framing, to admire the ?ne crossed beamed ceiling in the dining room and run ?ngers over the exposed cruck frame in the vaultemaster bedroom.
In the corner of the lounge is a distinguished .replace and on the .rst .oor an exposed cruck frame creates a dramatic arched entrance to the bedrooms.
All of them retain a number of period features including wide plank doors, stone floors and inglenook fireplace with bread oven in The Malt House while in Mill Cottages the cruck frame is visible, There are also exposed ceiling beams, casement windows and tiled roofs.
Mark had specialists date one :ne example in the older portion of the property, part of an original cruck frame. The dendrochronology established that the tree was felled in the spring of 1439.
Other selling points included in the pounds 267,500 asking price are oak doors, a stone inglenook in the dining room, vaulted ceiling in the sitting room, leaded windows in oak frames and interior views of the old cruck frame.
Medieval houses, some of which still exist in the Holme Valley, were single storey buildings with cruck frames and straw or heather roofs.
Few, if any, surviving houses in Wales have such a pristine series of cruck frames - roof and wall timbers shaped from naturally curved tree trunks.