Cruising Range

cruising range

[′krüz·iŋ ‚rānj]
(navigation)

Cruising Range

 

length of time a ship can stay at sea without replenishing supplies. The range is determined by reserves of fuel, water, food, ammunition, and other material necessities; in the case of submarines, it is determined by reserves of oxygen and the conditions for living underwater. In approximate figures, the cruising range of a submarine is 30–90 days; an aircraft carrier, 30 days; a cruiser, 20 days; and a destroyer, 12 days. Combat cruising range refers to the duration of uninterrupted engagement in combat without replenishing ammunition (fuel in the case of aircraft carriers and airplanes). It is calculated by several days and depends on the intensity of combat.

References in periodicals archive ?
8L/100km and a cruising range of more than 600km, Eupheme provides Chinese consumers with an advanced, eco-friendly SUV at a highly competitive base price around USD 33,000 even before national NEV subsidies are incorporated.
With a cruising range of 1,050 nautical miles, the Majesty 100 can sail at up to 23 knots due to her two powerful 1,900 horsepower MAN engines, while the economy speed of 12.
Above and beyond conventional ideas of toughness, the eighth-generation Hilux provides ride comfort that make long, tough drives less gruelling, a quiet cabin that allows communication in any conditions, and enhanced cruising range thanks to improved fuel efficiency.
Terrafugia's Transition model has a cruising range of around 400 miles and a 100 mph top speed.
We have the lean burn technology, which in normal cruising range, the engine continually leans back the fuel-air ratio until you're getting better gas mileage.
It has maximum speed of 70 km/h for paved road and 50 km/h for cross country, with a cruising range of 450 km.
Nissan has revealed a prototype of the world's first vehicle powered by a solid oxide fuel-cell (SOFC), which runs on bio-ethanol electricity and offers a cruising range of 600km.
The zero-emission e-NV200 prototype, which was unveiled in Brazil, boasts a cruising range in excess of 600km.
The e-Bio Fuel-Cell prototype vehicle runs on 100 per cent ethanol to charge a 24kWh battery which enables a cruising range of more than 600km.
With a maximum speed of 25 knots and cruising range of 1,500 miles, it can carry a 25-man crew.
Using hydrogen as fuel to generate electricity, Mirai achieves superior environment performance with no CO2 emissions or pollutants when driving, and the same level of convenience and autonomy as gasoline engine vehicles, with a generous cruising range and a hydrogen refuelling time of about three to five minutes.
or pollutants while a generous cruising range and a hydrogen refuelling time of around three minutes provide the same level of convenience as a petrol-powered car.