Cryptococcus

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Cryptococcus

[‚krip·tə′käk·əs]
(mycology)
A genus of encapsulated pathogenic yeasts in the order Moniliales.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
neoformans (serotypeD); the VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV types to Cryptococcus gattii (serotypesB andC) (3,5-7,9,12).
Genotype and mating type distribution within clinical Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates from patients with cryptococcal meningitis in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
* Timing the Origin of Cryptococcus gattii sensu stricto, Southeastern United States
Castaneda, "Retrospective study of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of Cryptococcus gattii infections in Colombia from 1997-2011," PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol.
MICs and minimum fungicidal concentrations of posaconazole, voriconazole and fluconazole for Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. J Antimicrob Chemother.
E a Criptococose primaria de hospedeiro aparentemente imunocompetente, endemica em areas tropicais e subtropicais, causada predominantemente pelo Cryptococcus gattii (sorotipo B e C) (Quadro 1).
Among their topics are preparing for serious communicable diseases in the US: lessons from the ebola virus epidemic, measles in the US since the millennium: perils and progress in the post-elimination era, antimicrobial resistance expression by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: a major global public health problem in the 21st century, emerging fungal infections in the Pacific Northwest: the unrecognized burden and geographic range of Cryptococcus gattii and Coccidioides immitis, and the amphibian fungal disease chytridiomycosis as a key example of the global phenomenon of emerging wildlife infectious diseases.
Cryptococcus gattii causes disease and is most common in immunocompetent people.
Cryptococcus gattii, formerly known as Cryptococcus neoformans var gattii, is being investigated because of its quick emergence, expanding ecological niche in the United States, and increased virulence.
Other projects to be funded as part of this initiative include a clinical trial of a new vaccine to prevent malaria; a long-term follow-up study of patients treated for Cryptococcus gattii, an airborne fungus that can cause severe, sometimes fatal respiratory infections; and a clinical trial of a new drug treatment to prevent relapse in a form of childhood leukemia.
Scientists interbred different strains of the Cryptococcus gattii fungus to test how easily the characteristics can transfer to other strains.
Galanis et al., "Spread of Cryptococcus gattii in British Columbia, Canada, and detection in the Pacific Northwest, USA," Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol.