Cryptodira


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Cryptodira

[‚krip·tə′dī·rə]
(vertebrate zoology)
A suborder of the reptilian order Chelonia including all turtles in which the cervical spines are uniformly reduced and the head folds directly back into the shell.

Cryptodira

 

an order of turtles of the subclass Testudinata. The carapace consists of bony plates covered with horny scales. The neck and head can be withdrawn into the carapace by a vertical flexure of the neck.

There are 140 species, making up 30 genera from six families. The turtles represent about two-thirds of all living turtle species. The six families are Emydidae (common freshwater turtles), Kinosternidae (mud turtles and musk turtles), Chelydridae (snapping turtles), Dermatemydidae (with a single species, the Central American river turtle), Platysternidae (with a single species, the big-headed turtle), and Testudinidae (land tortoises). The USSR has two species of common freshwater turtles and two species of land tortoises.

Some zoologists consider the Cryptodira a suborder.

References in periodicals archive ?
Pleistocene Fossil Turtles (Testudinoidea, Cryptodira) from the Talara Tar Seeps, Peru
Translating natural history into geographic space: a macroecological perspective on the North American Slider, Trachemys scripta (Reptilia, Cryptodira, Emydidae).
Southernmost localities of Trachemys dorbigni and first record of Trachemys scripta elegans for Argentina (Cryptodira: Emydidae).
(2014): New generic proposal for the European Neogene large testudinids (Cryptodira) and the first phylogenetic hypothesis for the medium and large representatives of the European Cenozoic record.
(2005) A Trionychidae (Reptilia: Testudines, Cryptodira) from the Pliocene of Costa Rica, Southern Central America.
Reptilia Testudines Cryptodira Testudinidae Testudo sp.