crypt

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crypt

(krĭpt) [Gr.,=hidden], vault or chamber beneath the main level of a church, used as a meeting place or burial place. It undoubtedly developed from the catacombs used by early Christians as places of worship. Early churches were commonly built over the tombs of martyrs. Such vaults, located beneath the main altar, developed into the extensive crypts of the Middle Ages that in many churches of the 11th and 12th cent. occupied the entire space beneath the sanctuary. At Canterbury the 12th-century crypt forms a large and complete lower church in itself. The crypt of the Rochester Cathedral is partly above ground. The cathedrals at Chartres and at Bourges have crypts typical of the Gothic development.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Crypt

A story in a church, below or partly below ground level, and under the main floor, often containing chapels and sometimes tombs; a hidden subterranean chamber or complex of chambers and passages.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Crypt

 

(1) In ancient Rome, any vaulted area of a building, wholly or partly underground.

(2) In Western European medieval architecture, a chapel under a church (usually under the altar) used as a burial place of honor. Crypts were widespread in early medieval architecture.


Crypt

 

the interior chamber of a tomb, usually partly underground, intended for the interment of the deceased.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a crypt?

In a dream a crypt or a catacomb can represent the womb. Alternatively, a space beneath the ground often represents the unconscious mind. (See also Burial, Coffin, Dead/Death, Grave, Hearse).

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

crypt

[kript]
(anatomy)
A follicle or pitlike depression.
A simple glandular cavity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crypt

crypt
1. A story in a church below or partly below ground level and under the main floor, particularly of the chancel, often containing chapels and sometimes tombs.
2. A hidden subterranean chamber or complex of chambers and passages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crypt

1. a cellar, vault, or underground chamber, esp beneath a church, where it is often used as a chapel, burial place, etc.
2. Anatomy any pitlike recess or depression
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

crypt

Unix command to perform encryption and decryption.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
The three then stop in front of their own statues in the Crypt as a white chill starts to emerge towards them.
The aim of the research is to explore the space in front of the uncovered entrance to crypt, its cleaning and creating of the walled-up ossuary"An archaeological probe was placed in front of the uncovered entrance in the northern part of the church near the entrance to the sacristy.
Our crypt is like a condominium with four niches per row and my father remarked recently that my mother had bought theirs long before and that she chose the lowest niche because then, we could set a bouquet of flowers on the floor by her grave.
In Egyptian lore, Set trapped his brother Osiris in a crypt, killed him and then cut the body into numerous little pieces.
In a 1973 study by Kaye et al, (9) the authors found that when compared to the normal progressive maturation of cells in colonic crypts, "the hyperplastic epithelium exhibits a similar progression, the primary difference being that most of the morphological features of maturing and mature cells are found either lower in the crypt or in exaggerated form at the same level of the crypt when compared with normal mucosa in the same colon." A year later, Hayashi et al (10) used electron microscopy to show that the cells on the surface of hyperplastic polyps looked hypermature and demonstrated a decreased rate of migration in cells from base to surface when using autoradiography.
Scientists have known about these crypts for more than 250 years but never really understood why they existed.
The crypts of both wild-type (P<0.001) and [APOE.sup.-/-] (P<0.01) mice given the 5-FU challenge were significantly longer than those of PBS controls, a finding that was partially reversed (P<0.001) or improved (P<0.0001) by Ala-Gln administration (Figure 3).
The archdiocese became the first religious group in the state to enter the headstone business two years ago, alarming dozens of small, independent companies that produce monuments and crypts.
crypts hidden below the ruins of Coventry Cathedral will -lic thanks to six-figure MYSTERIOUS crypts hidden below the ruins of Coventry Cathedral will be opened up to the public thanks to six-figure government funding.
Ulcers and microabscesses are also observed in the crypts, which are later replaced by dispersed connective tissue, leading to stenosis of the occupied segments in advanced cases [2].
Established in 1835 for the entombment and final resting place of its church's dead, Auburn's Farmville Baptist Church Cemetery provides a small and in depth history through the headstones and crypts of its past members.