Czardas

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Czardas

 

a Hungarian folk dance performed by couples to 2/4 time. The czardas, which appeared in the mid-19th century, consists of one slow section and one fast, impetuous section. It has syncopated rhythms, and many steps are improvised. The czardas served as the basis of ballroom dance that became popular in Russia in the early 20th century as the vengerka. Musical reworkings of the czardas are found in Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsodies, Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, Delibes’s Coppélia, and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
27, as well as three works by Franz Liszt: Csardas Obstine; 'Mephisto' Waltz No.
The traditional songs are either slow, or dance songs (especially the csardas).
By the early twentieth century, the full settlement of dualism had changed the situation, but the need to express a national consciousness and the pride of being equal to the Austrians was present and found its way into popular forms of culture like the operetta, for which a world-famous example is Imre Kalman's Csardas Queen.
Hinman taught a combination of ball room and folk dance to both sexes at Chicago's Hull House as early as 1897, and ten years later, the Principal at P.S 15 in Manhattan crowed that some sixty "healthy, happy" fifth-grade girls in the Burchenal Athletic Club regularly performed fifteen Northern European dances, from the Irish Jig to the Hungarian Csardas, Swedish Frykdalspolkska, Russian Comarinskaia and a Minuet.
With slightly different text, two of its three verses appear on a recent recording by the Tukros Ensemble, currently one of Budapest's leading folk revival groups ("Juhasznota, csardas es friss" on Tukros Tabor Hungarian Village Music, Folk Europa FECD 005 [2002], CD).
Then will come a number of arias that refer to divas, such as "Art is calling for me" from Victor Herbert's "The Enchantress," "Der holle Rache" and "Monostatos' Song " from Mozart's "Die Zauberflote," "Chi il bel sogno" from Giacomo Puccini's "La Rondine," "Soave sia il vento" from Mozart's "Cosi fan tutte," "Una voce poco fa" from Gioacchino Rossini's "The Barber of Seville," "Csardas" from Johann Strauss II's "Die Fledermaus" and "Sull'aria" from Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro."
They apparently knew klezmer repertoire, but chose not to play it, because nobody asked to hear it, performing instead melodies from operettas, csardas, tango, waltzes and other light music.
Verbunkos and csardas idioms pervade the music of these composers when they sought to evoke nationalist sentiment.
Her two principal arias, including the coloratura and very demanding "Csardas" were superbly performed.
Laura Whalen sparkled as Rosalinde, her Csardas at Prince Orlotsky's villa a highlight in spite of an ear-jarring glitch in the orchestral accompaniment on one chord.