Cubic feet per minute


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Cubic feet per minute

A measure of the volume of a substance flowing through air within a fixed period of time. With regard to indoor air, refers to the amount of air, in cubic feet, that is exchanged with outdoor air in a minute’s time; i.e., the air exchange rate.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
You should ask what sort of cubic feet per minute of flow a smoke evacuator can manage.
ASTF's C-Plant air supply compressors can provide up to 1,500 pounds of air per second (more than one-million standard cubic feet per minute) into a jet engine to simulate airspeeds up to 2,000 miles per hour.
The 1.7-pound, 13-inch-tall tabletop model, which is available in three different filter designs and three different docking station accent colors, utilizes "HepaSilent" technology to filter air at a rate of about 45 cubic feet per minute. It is also designed for a small room or workspace.
The project will use about 2,500 cubic feet per minute of landfill gas, which will generate over 60,000,000 kilowatt-hours per year -- enough energy to power 5,400 homes for a year.
The standard system requires approximately 400cfm (cubic feet per minute) per ton to flow across the coils.
LPACs, which deliver 200 standard cubic feet per minute at 125 pounds per square inches forced pressure, support numerous shipboard functions and services.
The fan can operate at three speeds: 1,600, 2,000, and 2,500 cubic feet per minute.
GME is offering a turbine-style ventilation system capable of 5,000-14,000 cubic feet per minute ventilation that can be used for tank maintenance, work in vaults and in similarly confined spaces.
More in-depth topics also are explored, such as air exchanges per hour and how to calculate the cubic feet per minute needed to achieve the desired AEH.
Until the mid-1970s, building ventilation standards called for approximately 15 cubic feet per minute (cfm) outside air for each building occupant.
According to the EPA, in the early- and mid-1900s, building ventilation standards recommended approximately 15 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of outside air for each building occupant (primarily to dilute and remove body odors!).
The portable units provide 3 to 4.5 cubic feet per minute of breathable air to up to four people in areas that cannot be pressurized, such as open vehicles, or where gas masks are the preferred means of protection.