Cuirassiers


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Cuirassiers

 

an arm of heavy cavalry, with horsemen protected by cuirasses and armed with broadswords, pistols, and carbines. Cuirassiers appeared in Western Europe in the late 17th century. Their precursors were the gendarmes in France and the reiters in Germany, Austria, and Sweden. In the 18th and early 19th centuries cuirassier regiments designed for delivering decisive strikes were to be found in most European armies. By the beginning of the 20th century the cuirassiers had been abolished (except for the dress uniform) and the name “cuirassier” became traditional for various regiments in certain armies.

In Russia the first regiment of cuirassiers (the Life Guards Horse Regiment) was formed in November 1731. By 1740 there were four cuirassier regiments, and by 1796 their number had risen to 16. Before the Patriotic War of 1812 there were ten cuirassier regiments; after the war there were 12, which made up three cuirassier divisions. In 1860 they were reorganized as dragoons, with the exception of four guards regiments (the Cavalry Guards, the Horse Guards, and two called His Majesty’s Cuirassiers and Her Majesty’s Cuirassiers, who were distinguished by the color of their uniforms, that is, the “yellow” and “blue” cuirassiers) that existed until 1917.

References in periodicals archive ?
hanging on a belt by a swivel, a flask and touch-box [priming flask], and pistols like the Cuirassiers ...
Shot 188 frames the scene in a long shot from behind the head of a cuirassier whose helmet reflects the room but hides the cat from sight, so that all we see is Andreotti standing in the middle as if paralyzed.
Sergeant Thirion of the 2nd Cuirassiers, who carried one in Russia, described it simply as `at the end of a fairly long staff was a bronze eagle with open wings ...' Great precautions were taken to prevent their loss.
(Technically there were no regiments of cavalry known titled Cuirassiers. The regiment of Royal Cuirassiers, established in 1660, of course was discontinued after the Revolution.
De Zola encore, L'CEuvre, autre roman sur un peintre a la recherche de lui-meme, et La Debacle, avec ses regiments epuises, scs generaux perdus et son peuple dechire De Hugo, pour les cuirassiers de Waterloo, dans Les Miserables.
He quotes French cuirassiers (heavy cavalrymen) as saying that their sabers were "virtually useless in hand-to-hand cavalry fighting" (p.
There were gold-bedecked drum-majors, iron-clad cuirassiers with black horsehair plumes on their helmets and the Garde Imperiale resplendent in the national colours of France.
Defoe then proceeds to speak of the ferocious cuirassiers led by Baron Kronenburg, whom none of the Swedes wanted to fight and who left the battle intact,(21) in contrast with some troops who refuse quarter and die in the formation in which they had been placed.
The Life Guards played a key role at the Battle of Waterloo as they formed the front charging line of the Household Brigade and staged a major assault against the French Cuirassiers (powerfully-built men on big horses) which saved the British centre from being over-run.
The first Berthiers approved for service were the Carabine de Cavallerie Modele 1890, Carabine de Cuirassiers Modele 1890, and the Carabine de Gendarmerie Modele 1890.
Although LeDonne's historiography is masterly, the mountain of details involving "cuirassiers," "carbineers," "hussars," "dragoons," "grenadiers," and "chasseurs," including their deployments and maneuvers across the heartland, will often infuriate and frustrate anyone but a military historian, for whom the book is clearly designed.