culture-specific syndrome

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culture-specific syndrome

[¦kəl·chər spə¦sif·ik ′sin‚drōm]
(psychology)
Any form of disturbed behavior that is specific to a certain cultural system and does not conform to western classification of diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having failed in life, Koichi becomes reclusive (hikikomori-acute social withdrawal-is considered a culture-bound syndrome), eventually deciding to end his life.
(1) As the authors rightly pointed out, Dhat syndrome is a 'culture reactive syndrome' rather than a 'culture-bound syndrome' since it is also reported in many other geographical regions including Central Asia, China, Russia, America, and Europe.
[1] Bulimia could therefore be a culture-bound syndrome (CBS), or according to Ritenbaugh (1982) - "a constellation of symptoms which has been categorized as a dysfunction or disease.
Another consideration is the culture-bound syndrome amok.
Ataques de nervios in Puerto Rico: culture-bound syndrome or popular illness?
Hwa-byung (HB; see model in Figure 1 developed by Choi, Pang, & Kim, 2006) is a Korean culture-bound syndrome that translates into English as an anger disorder.
Washington, July 8 (ANI): Brown University political scientist Ross Cheit has challenged two Harvard University psychiatrists' claims that the controversial psychiatric disorder called dissociative amnesia, aka repressed memory, is not a natural neuropsychological phenomenon, but instead a culture-bound syndrome, dating from the nineteenth century.
Nos trabalhos de psiquiatria transcultural, o Windigo foi classicamente apresentado como uma sfndrome ligada a cultura (culture-bound syndrome) especifica das populacoes subarticas do Canada.
Brown suggests, intriguingly, that multiple personality disorder may be a culture-bound syndrome. Finally, Brown assesses the benefits and future of channeling.
Their avowed concern is the "psychological historiography of a culture-bound syndrome." Yet the presentation of hundreds of vignettes of self-starvation, detached from any analysis of the contexts--social, cultural, intellectual, and religious--in which this bizarre behavior acquired meaning, renders it impossible to see how the syndrome was bound to its culture, and thus dooms their project to failure.
There is also information on cultural expectations for professional dress codes, acceptable interactions between men and women, and culture-bound syndromes. An appendix describes various illnesses and physical, mental, and emotional conditions and gives notes on ethnic populations most affected by them, from alcoholism to zar (spirit possession).
There are many culture-bound syndromes, for example, some of which are mentioned in the classification systems, and more new ones are fast emerging.
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