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Googleburger

Lab-grown hamburger. Culminating years of research, in 2013, vascular biologist Mark Post at Maastricht University (Netherlands) succeeded in growing the first meat in a petri dish using muscle-specific stem cells from a cow. The project was funded by Google founder Sergey Brin to pioneer a new way to produce meat in order to accommodate the planet's growing population and not perpetuate the compassionless and antibiotic-laden methods of raising cattle. See Google.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The global alternative protein market study presents historical market data in terms of both value and volume (2017 and 2018), estimated current data (2019), and forecasts for 2025-by stage (emerging alternative protein (insect, algae, duckweed, and lab meat), adolescent alternative protein (pea, rice, corn, potato, and others), and matured alternative protein (soy, wheat, canola, mushroom, mycoprotein, and others)); and application (plant protein based products, insect protein based, aquatic plant protein based products, microbial protein based, and cultured meat based products.
Building on earlier moves to diversify its protein business, Cargill invested in Aleph Farms, a cultured meat company focused on growing complex meat varieties such as steak.
Startups in the agricultural space are using technology to improve animal health; breeding; farm management and techniques; create cultured meat, and change the way food is distributed to restaurants and homes.
Cattlemen's Association has lobbied the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to define "meat" as a product deriving from an animal "slaughtered in the traditional manner" and for cultured meat to be labeled, simply, "protein."
Kearney predicts that by 2040, cultured meat will make up 35 percent of meat consumed worldwide, while plant-based alternatives will compose 25 percent.
"Currently, cultured meat is expensive, including cultured mouse," Because Animals CEO Sharon Falconer says.
Proponents of lab-grown meat, also known as cultured meat, talk up its many benefits, including how it is more ethical than factory farming, less harmful to the environment, and less susceptible to disease.
Also called cultured meat, cell-cultured food products and synthetic meat, lab meat is a form of cellular agriculture produced by the in vitro cultivation of animal cells.
Cultured meat is an interesting concept that could hit stores soon.
Some projects envisage using automation, biochemistry and tissue re-engineering, or developing cultured meat from cells.
"I suspect that cultured meat proteins can do things that plant-based proteins can't in terms of flavor, nutrition, and performance," says Isha Datar, who leads New Harvest, an organization that helps fund research in cellular agriculture.