Googleburger

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Googleburger

Lab-grown hamburger. Culminating years of research, in 2013, vascular biologist Mark Post at Maastricht University (Netherlands) succeeded in growing the first meat in a petri dish using muscle-specific stem cells from a cow. The project was funded by Google founder Sergey Brin to pioneer a new way to produce meat in order to accommodate the planet's growing population and not perpetuate the compassionless and antibiotic-laden methods of raising cattle. See Google.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latest research on whether consumption of insects, cultured meat ('lab-based', or synthetic meat) or imitation meat could reduce global agricultural land use has thrown up some interesting findings.
That said, we may be a long way from seeing cultured meat on grocery store shelves.
In 2013, a burger grown in the University of Maastrich's cultured meat lab was taste-tested in London, and did not receive rave reviews.
Another alternative--test-tube meat, also known as cultured meat, in vitro meat, and lab meat--is probably decades off, despite the introduction of a $332,000 burger at a London press conference in August 2013.
Cultured meat, as it is called, captured the imaginations of techies, environmentalists and animal rights groups--including People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), which, in 2008, offered $1 million to the first person to develop and market a test-tube chicken.
Removing cholesterol and other elements causing cardio-vascular diseases from meat will be one of the major advantages of cultured meat in a laboratory, Dr Mark Post, Professor of Physiology at Mstricht University, said in an interview at the Global Forum for Innovations in Agriculture in the capital.
Altogether, the first ever cultured meat burger required three billion cow cells and Euro 25,000, if commercially produced, the price for the lab-burger would reach $65 per kilogram.
It also included keynote speeches from Bill Gates, co-founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Dr Frank Rijsberman, CEO of CGIAR, Dr Mark Post, the scientist behind the Google-funded lab burger, and Andras Forgacs, CEO of Modern Meadow and pioneer of cultured meat and leather.
Under ideal conditions, study co-author Hanna Tuomisto has said, if cultured meat constituted half of all meat consumed, then we could halve the greenhouse emissions associated with meat production (estimated by the FAO to be 14.
Specific topics include biotechnology-derived enzymes for food applications advanced fermentation processes, producing cultured meat from a stem cell biology perspective, chromatography, supercritical extraction, process analytical technology, recovery and biotechnological production of high-value added products from fruit and vegetable residues, and beer.
Yet an opposite scenario is, at this point, equally tenable: that for a number of reasons such as inability to reduce costs of production to a competitive point, opposition from threatened economic interests, or simply a society-wide rejection of food produced in such a manner for reasons of aesthetics or subjective preference, cultured meat might be rejected outright.