Cumaean sibyl


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Cumaean sibyl

was granted long life by Apollo; when she rejected his love, he withheld eternal youth and she withered away. [Gk. Myth.: Metamorphoses, 14]

Cumaean sibyl

famous prophetess; leads Aeneas through underworld. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Guide
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Romanticismo' includes a handful of foreigners to give the wider perspective--among them Caspar David Friedrich's Moon Rising Over the Sea (1821) from the Hermitage, a little Corot of the Roman campagna (1826) from the National Gallery in London, and Turner's Lake Avernus: Aeneas and the Cumaean Sibyl (c.
The faces were mainly those of artists and poets as diverse as Leon Battista Alberti, Francis Picabia, and Guillaume Apollinaire; but also included, for instance, was Michelangelo's Cumaean Sibyl.
This and other cards are laid by the cartomancer Madame Sosostris in Part I "The Burial of the Dead." The other two principal seers in the poem are the Cumaean Sibyl who wishes for death in the epigraph and the blind Tiresias, a man who lived as a woman for many years, in Part III "The Fire Sermon." (10) Of these three, Sosostris's cards are of primary interest here, but attention is given to the other two as they have counterparts in the Dark Tower where their prognostications overlap with those of the cartomancer.
1508), the Study for the Head of the Cumaean Sibyl (c.
It is argued that the epigraph of the poem needs special attention because it seems to hold the key to an understanding of the poem: "For on one occasion I myself saw, with my own eyes, the Cumaean Sibyl hanging in a cage, and when some boys said to her, 'Sibyl, what do you want'?
altogether by being reflected in the mind of the Cumaean Sibyl.
She has a message for the reader and speaks to him or her: "For on one occasion I myself saw, with my own eyes, the Cumaean Sibyl hanging in a cage, and when some boys said to her, 'Sibyl, what do you want?' she replied, 'I want to die.'" (T.S.
In language no less sexual than Le Guin's, Dryden first casts himself in a passive female role, waiting until irresistible inspiration "invades" him, then claims a hyperbolic male vigor ("double strength"), and finally collapses into sexual exhaustion, "languishing and spent." His main source is the prophecy of the Cumaean Sibyl in the Aeneid, and his later translation of that passage makes the imagery of violent sex, which is relatively latent in the Latin, obvious and explicit.
He begins with a Latin edition of the book faced with English translation, and appends a discussion of Virgil's sources for the Cumaean Sibyl. Latin and English words are indexed separately.
Moreover, Lewis characterizes Corinne's genius as emanating from within, a la Shelley in A Defence of Poetry, whereas other scholars, including myself, have argued elsewhere that it is imposed more generally from without--she seems to be inhabited by other forces when she takes the stage, described in terms that evoke the Cumaean Sibyl and the Prophets of the Old Testament ("A Genius for the Modern Era: Madame de Stael's Corinne," FCFS 30: 3-4 and "Articulating Balzac's Genius at the Crossroads of the Nineteenth Century," Excavatio 16: 1-2).
Sir Robert kept Claude Lorrain's landscape, A Prospect of Baiae with Apollo and the Cumaean Sibyl close to him whilst he was in Downing Street as the King's first minister.