cumulus cloud

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cumulus cloud

[′kyü·myə·ləs ‚klau̇d]
(meteorology)
A principal type of cloud in the form of individual, detached elements which are generally dense and possess sharp nonfibrous outlines; these elements develop vertically, appearing as rising mounds, domes, or towers, the upper parts of which often resemble a cauliflower.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 3 provides another striking example of how cumulus clouds, making the sky heterogeneous in the visible, become hard to distinguish in the UV photograph.
It would be more accurate to say that some droplets are eroded away and that the ones that are left over are just as big as they were at the start,' Shaw says, cautioning that the parameters of the study looked only at a single dry region and focused on water only in cumulus clouds.
We took off and got above some puffy cumulus clouds, but I could see many darker cells in the distance already dropping rain.
The dark cumulus clouds appeared suddenly on city horizons, accompanied with strong gusts of wind resulting in heavy downpour which continued for a considerable time.
It's got to have something to do with the clouds," he said Thursday morning, as puffy cumulus clouds started forming in an increasing westerly wind; a day you might say would be perfect for making a trip from west to east.
That could even be a head, jutting out from the bottom of the 20-million-year-old fossil, at least in the sense that cumulus clouds sometimes resemble dragons.
studying cumulus clouds, the industry of bees in honeysuckle, sipping
The cumulus clouds over the buildings are starting to flatten out.
Hilltop-perched on a late spring morning recently, I observed argosies of cumulus clouds cruise like stately shadowed castles across an azure sky.
Because of the typical positive buoyancies in cumulus clouds the in-cloud vertical velocities tend to be dominated by upward motions.
China is one of the world's leading users of rain-making technology, which involves seeding cumulus clouds with dry ice or silver iodide to prompt precipitation.
After you descend into an amphitheater thick with ``hoodoos'' - as the multicolored rock formations have come to be called - your imagination is likely to take flight, much as it does when you gaze at elaborate white puffs of cumulus clouds.