cumulus humilis cloud

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cumulus humilis cloud

[′kyü·myə·ləs ′hyü·mə·ləs ‚klau̇d]
(meteorology)
A species of cumulus cloud characterized by small vertical development and a generally flattened appearance, vertical growth is usually restricted by the existence of a temperature inversion in the atmosphere, which in turn explains the unusually uniform height of the cloud. Also known as fair-weather cumulus.
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Here we were, close to the 500 mb surface, with dancing heat, "schlieren," rising into the air, an Assman psychrometer recording 9[degrees]C in beautiful sunshine that provided you with an instant sunburn, and cumulus humilis drifting lazily in a westerly breeze on top of a mixed layer that was at least 1000 m deep.
CUMULUS HUMILIS, or better known as "fair-weather cumulus," are your typical big, white puffy clouds.
In marine conditions of Tallinn (59[degrees]23'N, 24[degrees]40'E) 18% of summer days have shorter or longer fast moving cloud formations cumulus humilis. If sensor discovers such an event, recording with high resolution started and continued up to the end of the fast alternating radiation.
Recorded solar irradiance under a cloud formation cumulus humilis is a pure stationary stochastic process as it is or after elimination of the trend due to the changing altitude of the sun.
Using the minute-long sampling interval we will lose most of the information in the case of cumulus humilis (57 vs 275 positive fronts).
Day's picture, shot about 15 years ago, shows the light, fluffy clouds known as cumulus humilis drifting over a bucolic field and a big red barn north of McMinnville.
Researchers used a commercially available camera to take images of cumulus humilis and other optically thin clouds over north-central Oklahoma in a period of 7 minutes.