Cunegonde

Cunegonde

ravished in her father’s castle by two Bulgarian soldiers. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]
See: Rape
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References in periodicals archive ?
in his depiction of the maiden Cunegonde, a lover with whom Candide is
With equally effective physical comedy and singing, Gina Hanzlik captivated the audience as an endearingly over-the-top Cunegonde. Despite some spread in her vowel pronunciation, Hanzlik impressively traversed the obstacle course that is the coloratura of "Glitter and be Gay," all the while dancing across the stage and adorning jewellery.
Her recent stints singing Cunegonde in Bernstein's "Candide" for New York City Opera in 2017 and the title role in Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor" for Brooklyn's Regina Opera in 2016 were steps in that direction.
Jones's essay reads Cunegonde's aria "Glitter and Be Gay" from Leonard Bernstein's 1956 musical Candide as an expression of the queer sensibility known as camp.
You just have to think of what Cunegonde is thinking and feeling at that moment.
Joseph and Sainte Cunegonde parishes (in what is today Little Burgundy) the "pilot zone" for urban renewal in the city: the first phase of a "long-range, multi-pronged program of urban renewal." (76) Over the next seven years, nearly 800 newspaper articles on the urban renewal scheme found their way into the vertical files of the City of Montreal.
Cunegonde's Kidnapping: A Story of Religious Conflict in the Age of Enlightenment, by Benjamin J.
Cunegonde, "Candide," (PBS' "Great Performances"): "That was a pleasure and gift to play her," she says of the love interest Cunegonde who sings "Glitter and Be Gay" in Leonard Bernstein's musical adaptation of the Voltaire novel.
Candide offered the kind of anti-establishment social bite that MacTaggart sought, critiquing religion, war and patriotism through its satirical account of the violence and persecution experienced by a young man, Candide, as he travels the world in search of his true love Cunegonde. Using non-naturalistic images as scenery throughout, it foregrounded its storytelling by including the text's author, the French satirist and philosopher Voltaire (played by Frank Finlay), as a narrator present on screen, observing and commenting on the action and progressing the narrative.
Amusingly, he confuses real-life with drama and tries to kiss the actress playing his long lost love, Cunegonde.
He is now older and wiser but naively does not understand the purpose of drama and attempts to kiss the actress, who is playing his real life lost love, Cunegonde. He shouts angrily at the playwright: "You have stolen my life to torture me." Candide decides to change his story and go in search of Cunegonde.