Cunizza

Cunizza

amours with Sordello while married to first husband. [Br. Lit.: Sordello]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ez & Ez: Ezra Pound and Cunizza da Romano: Fragments of an Unfinished Epic Poem".
Most of Dante's canto is taken up by two narrators, Cunizza da Romano and Folco of Marseilles, whose combination of violent politics and sexuality is remarkably close to that of the repeatedly beating lovers Gao Ma and Jinju suffer in Mo Yan's novel The Garlic Ballads (1988), which catches the restless mood of China just before Tianamen Square (1989).
Linnaeus, 1758) X Pierinae Cunizza hirlanda ssp (Fruhstorfer, 1907) X Hesperocharis nera nera (W.
Il capitolo 4 si concentra da un lato sui personaggi di Piccarda, Costanza, Cunizza e Rehab, dall'altro sul gruppo della Rosa Celeste.
Next--and this, I think, is the best part of the book--comes an account of the rootedness for Dante of sexual and of religious yearning in one and the same passionate anthropology (the key text here being the Cunizza episode of Paradiso IX).
seems that Sordello abducted Cunizza from the Count Riccardo di San
Cunizza, Sordello's mistress, the sister of an Italian tyrant.
Chapter Four opens with the argument that the love of Charles Martel of Anjou, Cunizza da Romano, the Provencal love poet Folco, and the prostitute Rahab, strongly links them to the "polis" (97) as it is comprised of charity and friendship.
Cunizza also speaks of the vat which must receive the blood of refugees, executed in 1314 as a present from the Bishop of Feltre to the town's governor.
Many important figures and episodes across the textual and theological divisions of the three cantiche could be discussed as manifestations of this dialectical hermeneutics: one could plausibly argue for both opposition and continuity between Francesca from the infernal circle of lust and Cunizza in the sphere of Venus; between the heretic Farinata and, based on proud devotion to one's native city, the troubadour Sordello in Purgatory; between the suicide Pier della Vigna and his celestial counterpart Romeo, both falsely accused servants of their royal masters; between the rhetorically gifted Ulysses and the overly ambitious emperor Justinian, who appears in Mercury, and certainly between Ulysses and Adam, the prototypical human rebel.
The eleven speakers in Paradiso who are allowed to tell their own stories, ranging from Piccarda in Canto III (through Justinian, Charles Martel, Cunizza, Folco, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, Cacciaguida [perhaps, as Dante's ancestor, unsurprisingly the longest-winded, at 19 verses], Peter Damian, Benedict) to Adam in Canto XXVI, complete all of these eleven passages in some 150 verses scattered over twenty-four consecutive cantos.
In this context he examines briefly the lascivious Carlo Martello, Cunizza da Romano, Folchetto da Marsiglia, Raab and the lustful sinners in the Purgatorio.