Cunninghamia


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cunninghamia

 

a genus of evergreen conifers of the family Taxodiaceae. The crown is narrowly pyramidal. The leaves are linear-lanceolate, sharp-pointed, more or less spirally arranged, and shining. The cones are 3–4 cm long, roundish ovate, with greatly reduced seeds; they mature in the first year and do not fall off the tree. The seeds are narrowly winged. There are two known species. Cunninghamia konishil is native to Taiwan. The China fir (C. lanceolata) is widely distributed in the temperate regions of China, where its soft, lightweight, aromatic, and rot-resistant wood is used for buildings and various wood products. The China fir is cultivated as an ornamental on the Black Sea Shore of the Caucasus, where it grows and propagates well.

T. G. LEONOVA

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook), which is one of the most important native tree species in China, exhibits excellent timber quality and fast growth (Tian et al.
Wang, Stability of Soil Organic Carbon Changes in Successive Rotations of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) Plantations, J.
The low-mountain forestland (LF) is now covered with secondary shallow-rooted coniferous forests (altitude <800m a.s.1.), such as Cunninghamia lanceolata, Pinns massoniana, Cupressus funebris, and Pinns armandii (Xie and Chen 1998), and the local soils are classified as Udults (Soil Survey Staff 1992).
Fei, "Effects of intercropping Cunninghamia lanceolata in tea garden on contents and distribution of heavy metals in soil and tea leaves," Journal of Ecology and Rural Environment, vol.
Yj, "Intraspecific and interspecific competition analysis of Cunninghamia lanceolata ecological forest based on weighted Voronoi diagram," Chinese Journal of Ecology, vol.
Wang et al., "Nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) diameter growth models for individual China-fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) trees in southeast China," PLoS ONE, vol.
The remaining area has been replaced by plantations of mostly coniferous trees which include Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), Taiwania (Taiwania cryptomerioides), Taiwan red cypress (Chamaecyparis formosensis), China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), and Luanta fir (Cunninghamia konishii) [8].
Sargent, added a number of Asian conifers to an appendix to the book, including Cephalotaxus fortunei, Cryptomeria japonica, Juniperus chinensis, Torreya grandis, Cunninghamia lanceolata and Thujopsis dolabrata, all imported into the United States from English nurseries.
Seed vigor assessment for Cunninghamia lanceolata and Pinus massoniana using image processing.