Cupid

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Cupid:

see ErosEros
, in Greek religion and mythology, god of love. He was the personification of love in all its manifestations, including physical passion at its strongest, tender, romantic love, and playful, sportive love.
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Cupid

 

also Amor, in ancient Roman mythology, the deity of love, the personification of amorous passion. Cupid corresponds to the Greek god Eros. In art, beginning in the Hellenist epoch, cupids have been depicted as playful little boys.

Cupid

disguised as Ascanius, son of Aeneas. [Gk. Myth.: Aeneid]

Cupid

(Gk. Eros) god of love. [Rom. Myth.: Kravitz, 70]
See: Love

Cupid

while sleeping, revealed by Psyche’s lamp as her lover. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 822]
See: Sleep

Cupid

1. the Roman god of love, represented as a winged boy with a bow and arrow
2. any similar figure, esp as represented in Baroque art

CUPID

A graphic query language.

["CUPID: A Graphic Oriented Facility for Support of Nonprogrammer Interactions with a Database", N. McDonald, PhD Thesis, CS Dept, UC Berkeley 1975].
References in periodicals archive ?
Cupid called on shoppers from a Valentine's telephone box within the centre with an array of romantic compliments and on-the-spot prizes given to those who were lucky enough to pick up incoming calls when passing.
In the spirit of Cupid, our Valentine's telephone box proved a popular, feel-good homage to this enduring icon of affection.
The excavation site at Cupids is named one of the top ten active archaeological sites in Canada by The Beaver: Canada's History Magazine.
For more information about Cupids, go to CanadasHistory.
But Cupids said the employees went ahead and opened their own store, Vertige Lingerie in Little Rock, according to the lawsuit Cupids filed in Pulaski County Circuit Court.
Cupids has asked a judge to immediately issue an order stopping the defendants from being in the lingerie business for two years.
Tinkle's readers will never again rashly assume to know the meaning of any one medieval Venus or Cupid without taking into account the 'long clouds of meaning' that 'perforce trail behind them' (4).
The Matchmakers will be on hand to make introductions and play Cupid throughout the evening.
This book has the worthwhile goal of examining the multiple meanings of the deities Venus and Cupid in medieval mythography and mythographic poets, and thus of exploring the "multiple and shifting points of view on sexual love and desire," which are "conditioned by .
For example: the mythographers' Venus "directs our attention to ecclesiastical ideologies imposed on sex acts," while Cupid (representing "youthful masculine license'), "embodies a fundamental equivocation between desire .