copper oxide

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copper oxide

[′käp·ər ′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Dopants, such as strontium, lanthanum, and even europium added to the cuprate lattice, create distortions in the lattice structure which can either strengthen or weaken nematicity and charge density wave order in the CuO2 layer.
It would also redirect the efforts of many physicists who have been focusing on copper-based superconducting compounds called cuprates, discovered in 1986.
It has been reported that superconductors containing iron (pnictides) require lower temperatures than cuprates (Kamihara et al.
7] the continuous depletion of charge carriers has similar effects with charge depletion in other cuprates.
These new ceramic materials--copper-oxides, or cuprates, combined with various other elements --achieve superconductivity at temperatures as high as 138 degrees Kelvin, representing a major jump toward room-temperature superconductors.
Right now, even the most promising cuprate must be cooled to about 138 kelvins.
The field of superconductivity has gained much attention in recent years due to the discovery of the high temperature cuprate superconductors.
Weaver, Professor of Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, was the first to characterize fullereness and cuprate superconductor thin films.
Shen and his team looked at a sample of a cuprate superconductor and examined electronic behavior at the sample's surface, thermodynamic behavior in the sample's interior, and changes to the sample's dynamic properties over time.
2]Sn, (66-67) followed quickly by the cuprate superconductors (e.
So far, all of the HTS materials have been cuprate ceramic oxides.
In-Plane Rotated Crystal Structure in Continuous Growth of Bismuth Cuprate Superconducting Film by S.