copper oxide

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copper oxide

[′käp·ər ′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Materials containing CuO2 crystal layers (cuprates) are, at present, the best candidate for highest temperature superconductivity, operating at approximately -120 AC.
Caption: Figure 1: Simplified doping-dependent phase diagram of cuprate superconductors for both electron (n) and hole (p) doping.
It would also redirect the efforts of many physicists who have been focusing on copper-based superconducting compounds called cuprates, discovered in 1986.
Aharony, "Weak ferromagnetism in the low-temperature tetragonal phase of the cuprates," Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol.
Studies of the internal structure of cuprates and pnictides led researchers to the idea that a superconductor is a hamburger, in which the electric current flows through the 'meat', while the 'buns' act as a supplier of electrons (Collins, 2009).
These new ceramic materials--copper-oxides, or cuprates, combined with various other elements --achieve superconductivity at temperatures as high as 138 degrees Kelvin, representing a major jump toward room-temperature superconductors.
This strategy has been used to identify and quantify cation disorder in many complex solids, for example, the thallium cuprate superconductors [Tl.sub.2][Ba.sub.2]Cu[O.sub.6] [10] and [Tl.sub.0.5][Pb.sub.0.5][Sr.sub.2][Ca.sub.2][Cu.sub.3][O.sub.9] [11].
of Minnesota, was the first to characterize fullerenes and cuprate superconductor thin films.
High temperature superconducting resonators and phase shifters, and microwave digital phase shifters have been constructed using yttrium barium cuprate (YBCO) film with semiconductor PIN diodes serving as switches.[7] A four-bit superconducting phase shifter design along with a simulation that indicates maximum insertion loss of 1.1 dB at 10 GHz at 77 [degrees] K have also been presented.
More recently, a cerium-doped neodymium cuprate (Nd.sub.2-x Ce.sub.x.CuO.sub.4) with a T.sub.c of 24 K was found to have current carriers that are electrons.