current

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Related to Currents: Ocean currents

current

1. a mass of air, body of water, etc., that has a steady flow in a particular direction
2. the rate of flow of such a mass
3. Physics
a. a flow of electric charge through a conductor
b. the rate of flow of this charge. It is measured in amperes

Current

 

(i), a scalar quantity characterizing the time rate of flow of electric charge. It is equal to the ratio of the charge Δq transported through the cross section of a conductor in the time Δt to the time: i = Δqt. The unit of current is the ampere. Current is measured by means of ammeters.

current

[′kər·ənt]
(electricity)
The net transfer of electric charge per unit time; a specialization of the physics definition. Also known as electric current.
(physics)
The rate of flow of any conserved, indestructible quantity across a surface per unit time.

current

The flow of electricity in a circuit; the unit of measurement is the ampere.

current

i. A pilot qualified on a type of aircraft and presently cleared to fly without any additional checks.
ii. A civil aircraft that is on active register and in routine operation.

current

(electronics)
The quantity of charge per unit time, measured in Amperes (Amps, A). By historical convention, the sign of current is positive for currents flowing from positive to negative potential, but experience indicates that electrons are negatively charged and flow in the opposite direction.

current

(1) The flow of electrons through a circuit. Measured in "amperes." See amp and voltage.

(2) The latest version or model.

(3) (Current) An earlier Windows PIM from IBM that included a calendar, address book, phone dialer, outliner, word processor and Gantt charts for project tracking. It was revised by its developer, Jensen-Jones Inc., Red Bank, NJ, into a new package called Commence.
References in classic literature ?
The third day, in the morning, the wind having abated overnight, the sea was calm, and I ventured: but I am a warning to all rash and ignorant pilots; for no sooner was I come to the point, when I was not even my boat's length from the shore, but I found myself in a great depth of water, and a current like the sluice of a mill; it carried my boat along with it with such violence that all I could do could not keep her so much as on the edge of it; but I found it hurried me farther and farther out from the eddy, which was on my left hand.
Then sleep overpowered me, and I stretched myself on my couch of zostera, and slept profoundly, whilst the Nautilus was gliding rapidly through the current of the Black River.
But the wind was light, the Pyrenees' bottom was foul, and she could not beat up against the strong westerly current.
When they reached the place where the current had before changed, the fish was still swimming ahead in its wild attempt to escape.
she must use all her skill and power to manage the boat and get it if possible out of the current.
The current was bearing her swiftly down the river, and she found that only by dint of the utmost exertion could she direct the awkward craft toward the vicinity of the Kincaid.
Next, for about a half an hour, I whoops now and then; at last I hears the answer a long ways off, and tries to follow it, but I couldn't do it, and directly I judged I'd got into a nest of towheads, for I had little dim glimpses of them on both sides of me -- sometimes just a narrow channel between, and some that I couldn't see I knowed was there because I'd hear the wash of the current against the old dead brush and trash that hung over the banks.
The tug of the current was strong upon her, like a giant hand reaching up out of the cruel river to bear her back to death.
In the awful stench of these frightful charnel isles haggard maniacs screamed and gibbered and fought among the torn remnants of their grisly feasts; while on those which contained but clean-picked bones they battled with one another, the weaker furnishing sustenance for the stronger; or with clawlike hands clutched at the bloated bodies that drifted down with the current.
The current was about four miles an hour, with occasional rapids; some of them dangerous, but the voyagers passed them all without accident.
The current bore them along at a rapid rate; the light spirits of the Canadian voyageurs, which had occasionally flagged upon land, rose to their accustomed buoyancy on finding themselves again upon the water.
I rose and walked backward and forward, and tried to turn the current of my thoughts in some new direction.