curtain call

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curtain call

the appearance of performers at the end of a theatrical performance to acknowledge applause
References in periodicals archive ?
When, after several curtain calls, Alonso took her place among her company, the house rose in a roaring ovation.
They were all deserving of the acclaim they received at the curtain calls.
After numerous curtain calls for the cast, the man with hoe slowly rakes the rice into an infinite spiral, This fifteen-minute epilog, titled "Finale or the Beginning," holds us rapt.
Arthur Mitchell has for three decades personified the vision and ambition needed to shape a dance company from the plies to the curtain calls. For its thirtiet-anniversary season, Dance Theatre of Harlem set out to preserve and further its vision via a City Center season that was almost overly ambitious in its scope.
14 Stage manager's station Where the stage manager gives cues for the running of the program and the curtain calls
At the end of the evening, the curtain calls continued for more than half an hour.
When principal dancer Carlos Acosta danced the role of the Chosen One in Houston Ballet's 1997 production of Rite of Spring, audience members went wild, stomping their feet and screaming for Acosta to return for curtain calls. It wasn't the riot of Nijinsky's original, but it was enough to cement a permanent place for Tetley's choreography in the company.
In the role of Prince Florimund, the prince charming of the de Cuevas International Ballet's production of The Sleeping Beauty, he evoked twenty-eight curtain calls in an extraordinary ovation at the Theatre des Champs-Elysees....
It became apparent that the curtain was not going to rise, that there would be no curtain calls, and still the audience applauded.
Quintessential Balanchine ballerina Tanaquil LeClercq is to be honored and all former and current company members are invited to take part in a series of curtain calls. (The event is preceded two nights earlier by an alumni reunion.)
The absence of a curtain call, like many absences, speaks more loudly than its presence.
Although I must have sat through hundreds of them, until fairly recently I had never really given much thought to one particular peculiarity of theatre performance: the curtain call. Probably just enough to have realised that every single one is different.