general relativity

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general relativity

See relativity, general theory.

general relativity

[¦jen·rəl ‚rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The theory of Einstein which generalizes special relativity to noninertial frames of reference and incorporates gravitation, and in which events take place in a curved space.
References in periodicals archive ?
In semiclassical gravity, the gravitational field is still treated classically, being described by the curved spacetime of general relativity.
This is where the truly interesting research questions begin, for when one combines a quantum description of matter and energy with curved spacetime, it is known that situations involving negative mass can arise.
For wormholes, the key question still being investigated today is whether any plausible configuration of quantum fields in curved spacetime could create sufficient negative mass to hold open a macroscopic wormhole -- one large enough for a starship, a person, or even a single atom to pass through.
One way the Dirac field is incorporated into curved spacetime is to fix [[gamma].
In curved spacetime, there is no global notion of a boost so the former perspective seems more valuable.
00012[degrees] per year could be fully explained by Mercury'smotion in the curved spacetime around the Sun.
At this moment, the signals propagate through heavily curved spacetime, which takes slightly longer than the signals emitted away from conjunction, when they travel through flatter spacetime.
An example of the Casimir effect in curved spacetime has been considered for spherical geometries [11] in de Sitter space [12] and in the background of static domain wall [13].
Hence the deflection of light by the Sun is a way of directly measuring the in-flow speed at the Sun's surface, and has nothing to do with "real" curved spacetime.
mu]], usually used in the literature on the Dirac equation in curved spacetime.
ii) The relativistic particle in curved spacetime, described by the Schild action [37].