Custer Battlefield National Monument

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Custer Battlefield National Monument:

see Little BighornLittle Bighorn,
river, c.90 mi (145 km) long, rising in the Bighorn Mts., N Wyo., and flowing north to join the Bighorn River in S Mont. On June 25–26, 1876, Sioux and Cheyenne warriors defeated the forces of Col. George Custer in the Little Bighorn valley in Montana.
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, river; Little Bighorn National Battlefield under the National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table).
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress changed the name of Custer Battlefield National Monument to Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in 1991.
Those have included the renaming of Montana's Custer Battlefield National Monument to Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, North Cascades National Park's Coon Lake and Coon Creek to Howard Lake and Howard Creek (after an African American miner), and Negro Bar Channel, just outside Gateway National Recreation Area, to Joseph Sanford Jr.
The renaming of Custer Battlefield National Monument in Montana in 1991 to the Tittle Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is one example of how perspectives on facts and history can change.
Custer Battlefield National Monument Indian Memorial: Hearings on H.R.
I do know when I went to the Little Bighorn all those years ago, the place was called the Custer Battlefield National Monument. The name was changed in 1991 - on my birthday, ironically - to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.
Because of his efforts, Congress changed the name of the site from Custer Battlefield National Monument to the Little Bighorn National Monument and authorized a memorial to the Native Americans who fought there as well.
* In Montana, on December 10th, 1991, the National Park Service inaugurated the Little Big Horn National Battlefield, previously called the Custer Battlefield National Monument. The new signposts symbolised official recognition of a revisionary process that had turned George Armstrong Custer from hero to 'an immature personality beset with inner conflicts that could only be compensated by glory-seeking bravado and swagger', in the words of the eminent scholars of the frontier, Ray Allen, Billington and Martin Ridge.
(Native American activist Russel Means equated the Custer monument's existence in the heart of Indian country to placing a monument to fallen Nazis in Jerusalem.) Linenthal presents the National Park Service as harried brokers in this and other controversies--thus in December 1991 Custer Battlefield National Monument became Little Big Horn Battlefield National Monument and the Park Superintendent is Barbara Booher, a Native American woman.
Formerly known as Custer Battlefield National Monument, it had been one of few such battlefields named for a person rather than a site.
For most of the next century, the battle was known as Custer's Last Stand, the sire of the conflict as Custer Battlefield National Cemetery and later Custer Battlefield National Monument. The battleground was administered by the War Department until 1940, and many early staffers were themselves veterans of the Indian wars.
As a park superintendent, Booher was instrumental in persuading Congress to change the name of Custer Battlefield National Monument to Little Bighorn National Battlefield Park.