mycosis fungoides

(redirected from Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma)
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Related to Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma: mycosis fungoides, Sezary syndrome

mycosis fungoides

[mī¦kōs·əs fəŋ′gȯi‚dēz]
(medicine)
A lymphoma of the skin, usually present in several sites when first diagnosed, that may remain confined to the skin for 10 or more years before eventually spreading to internal organs and causing death.
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In addition, there can be no assurance as to timing or success of the Phase 3 clinical trial of SGX942 (dusquetide) as a treatment for oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer receiving chemoradiation therapy or the Phase 3 clinical trial of SGX301 (synthetic hypericin) for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. There also can be no assurance as to timing or success of the preclinical/clinical trials of RiVaxO, that RiVaxO will be approved for the PRV program or the amount for which a PRV for RiVaxO can be sold.
"Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas like mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome are chronic skin malignancies characterized by relapsing and remitting behavior and progressive resistance to treatments.
Extracorporeal photochemotherapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. An overview of current status.
Guitart et al., "Outcome of patients treated with a single-fraction dose of palliative radiation for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma," International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, vol.
A Phase II clinical study of the agent in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) or peripheral T-cell lymphoma is currently underway in Japan.
Very-late-onset atopic dermatitis and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) may look quite similar clinically.
Lessin, "Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma epidemiology: patients providing the power," Archives of Dermatology, vol.
Jones, "A stable aberrant immunophenotype characterizes nearly all cases of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in blood and can be used to monitor response to therapy," BMC Clinical Pathology, vol.
OncoSec's electroporation device, the OncoSec Medical System, now is being used in three ongoing clinical trials to treat metastatic melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.The device also has been used in Europe in Phase IV clinical trials to treat head and neck cancer and cutaneous and subcutaneous skin cancers.
SAHA is in a class of drugs called histone deacetylase inhibitors, and is approved for use in a cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.