cyanophage


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cyanophage

[sī′an·ə‚fāj]
(virology)
A virus that replicates in blue-green algae. Also known as algophage; blue-green algal virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Solar radiation-driven decay of cyanophage infectivity, and photoreactivation of the cyanophage by host cyanobacteria.
Three Prochlorococcus cyanophage genomes: Signature features and ecological interpretation.
Previous work had shown that cyanophage viruses have some photosynthesis genes, apparently used to keep the host cyanobacteria on life support during the infection, which otherwise knocks out the cells' basic functions.
They believe the viral complex has a unique shape that makes cyanophage photosynthesis hyperefficient.
So it is possible that as much as 5 per cent of the world's oxygen production results from cyanophage infected cells," he added.
According to the team, the viral photosystem I genes allow the cyanophages to not only take electrons from the proteins involved in photosythesis but also from other algal proteins.
Cyanobacterial core PSI gene cassettes, containing psaJFABCDEK, or psaDCAB gene cassettes forms unique clusters in cyanophage genomes, suggestive of selection for a distinct function in virus reproduction.
The main objective of this proposal is to gain a deep understanding of the genetic basis for the physiological differences in infection dynamics among closely related T7-like cyanophages that infect the globally important marine cyanobacteria, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, and to ascertain the ecological consequences of these physiological differences.
Others are examining how Synechococcus coexists with a diverse and abundant group of cyanophages.
Resistance to co-occurring phages enables marine Synechococcus communities to coexist with cyanophages abundant in seawater.