Cyanotype Process

Cyanotype Process

 

(blueprint process), an obsolete method for the production of line images (blueprints) using light-sensitive materials based on ferric salts of certain organic acids, such as citric and tartaric acids. The process depends on the capacity of ferric iron to reduce to ferrous iron, with light as a catalyst. The cyanotype process has been replaced completely by diazotype and electrophotographic systems.

References in periodicals archive ?
The cyanotype process uses a combination of chemicals and controlled light exposure to produce a rich, cyan-blue tinted negative effect, like architects' blueprints.
Of the various compositions Opera put into play here, his glass-bottle still lifes were of particular note, given the degree to which they foreground the light-recording phenomena intrinsic to the cyanotype process itself.
In addition, Michael Maunder exhibited some items relating to the history of the Association, and some examples of the first non-silver photographic process, invented by Sir John Herschel in 1842--the blueprint or cyanotype process.
Eighty-five images--which vary from a deceptively classic black-and-white landscape by Robert Adams to an enormous color tableau by Richard Misrach to an artful combination of image and text in the cyanotype process by Clarissa Sligh--honor the career of Michael E.
In 1842, astronomer Sir John Herschel invented the chrysotype, which produces images in collodial gold, as well as the more popular cyanotype process, which results in brilliant blue images.
Many early Fellows of the Society were also important contributors to the development of photography; men like Sir John Herschel, inventor of the Cyanotype process and Francis Galton, instigator of the composite photograph.
These intricate processes are a perfect match for Dugdale's photographs, which are dreamy visions of nudes and still lifes, all seen through a melancholy hazy blue, a product of the 19th-century cyanotype process.
Sir John Herschel, celebrated scientist and coiner of many photographic terms, including the term 'photography' itself, invented the cyanotype process outlining his discovery in his Royal Society essay of 1842.
Unable to draw without a model, he came to rely on photographs, which he took and developed himself using the cyanotype process, as a vital working tool.