cybercrime

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cybercrime

Some form of offense committed with the use of a computer against an individual or organization. Cybercrime is perpetrated to steal sensitive data, to illegally transfer funds as well as to cause harm. See ransomware, cybercrook and cyberextortion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The complexity and sophistication of cybercriminals and their attempts at destruction and mayhem have caused cybercrime threats to become more disastrous and more prevalent since the inception of the Council of Europe's Cybercrime Convention.
We recommend that 'content data' is replaced by 'computer data' in the Draft Law and refer to the Cybercrime Convention for a definition of 'computer systems'.
An attempt to correct these law enforcement deficiencies was the impetus for the creation of the Cybercrime Convention.
ratified the Cybercrime Convention in 2006, the Electronic Privacy Information Center and other watchdogs worried that the treaty could require American law enforcement agencies to turn people over to foreign police for engaging in activities that are legal here but treated as crimes in other countries.
activities the Cybercrime Convention intends to criminalize, it is
At present, the Cybercrime Convention is the only existing internationally accepted benchmark, inter alia, for the procedural powers aimed at the collection of electronic evidence.
The Council of Europe Cybercrime Convention 2001 "addresses an important problem: the difficulties law enforcement has in pursing criminals across national borders, something that is common in Internet crime" (Lemos 2001, p.
Intentional attacks on a computer system are treated as crimes in a growing number of countries, as discussed above in connection with the Council of Europe Cybercrime Convention.
The Council of Europe's Cybercrime Convention covers most European countries, including Russia and other former Soviet republics.
The Council of Europe's Cybercrime Convention, another European initiative aimed at harmonizing cybercrime laws between European countries, covers similar ground but is still far from being ratified.
Senator Loren Legarda, Chair of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, today said that the Senate has unanimously concurred in the ratification of five (5) treaties covering the Philippines' Double Taxation Avoidance Agreements (DTAA) with Mexico, Thailand and Sri Lanka, the Cybercrime Convention, and the Agreement on the ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic Research Office (AMRO).
What articles of the Cybercrime Convention can be relevant in this