cyberslacker

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cyberslacker

An employee who uses the office computer for personal enjoyment. Since it is so easy to flip between a business application and an entertainment, social or shopping page on the Web, many employees do it routinely if their computers are not locked down. Company firewalls can be configured to prevent access to popular websites, such as YouTube, Facebook and Amazon; however, there are millions of other sites, which makes this approach only partially effective. See lock down.
References in periodicals archive ?
The question that needs to be answered is: Why do employees engage in cyberloafing or cyberslacking? Today, more and more companies are concerned that a large number of their workers are spending more time surfing in the Internet during office hours activities that are not work-related.
According to a survey conducted by Staff Monitoring, cyberslacking accounts for 30-40 percent of lost productivity.
Some of these terms include: personal web usage, cyberslacking and cyberloafing (as used in this study).
Personal email use is becoming a factor in "cyberslacking," the use of employer time on the Internet for non-business activities.
Early studies of cyberslacking and cyberloafing assumed that employee behavior was entirely negative and needed to be eliminated through some means.
"Cyberslacking and the Procrastination Superhighway: A Web-based Survey of Online Procrastination, Attitudes, and Emotion." Social Science Computer Review 19: 431-444.
Taking this a step further, the impact of Internet distractions on Today's Fortune 1000 is in the multi-billion-dollar range (Cyberslacking at work, 2000).
Popular social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace are also common cyberslacking destinations.
Next, according to another published report, productivity in the workplace is rapidly plummeting, due to the burgeoning phenomenon of "cyberslacking," or the abuse of desktop computers by employees who spend as much as 40 percent of their time performing tasks that are not related to business.
They also are concerned with employee productivity and business efficiency, as "cyberslacking accounts for 30 to 40 percent of lost worker productivity." (7) With respect to legal liability, one commentator has stated, "Via the recent expansion of the strict liability doctrine of respondent superior, an employee may be held strictly liable for the foreseeable torts and crimes of employees." (8) Therefore, monitoring may assist employers in preventing and discouraging sexual or other illegal workplace harassment, defamation, copyright violations from the illegal downloading of software, music and movies, and the deliberate or inadvertent disclosure of trade secrets and other confidential information.
Personal e-mail traffic is predicted to rise a further 28pc this Christmas and Open Orchard - a BT group business offering web and e-mail monitoring systems - says this cyberslacking will cost medium-sized companies in Wales pounds 8m and could endanger both jobs and businesses.
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