information warfare

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information warfare

Also called "cyberterrorism" and "cyberwarfare," it refers to creating havoc by disrupting the computers that manage stock exchanges, power grids, air traffic control, telecommunications and defense systems. The traditional viruses, Trojans and denial-of-service attacks are part of the arsenal, all aimed at disrupting a government rather than a company. See virus, Trojan and denial-of-service attack.

Information warfare is increasingly the first offensive move before the start of a physical attack. The military in many countries have full-time cyberwarriors on the payroll, because the more successful a cyberattack on an early warning defense system, the greater the success of the real attack. For example, according to the book "Cyber War," North Korea may have as many as a thousand hackers stationed in China, working on knocking out systems in South Korea and other countries.

The first book to deal with the subject was "Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway," written by Winn Schwartau in 1994. Cited above, "Cyber War," by Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake is an eye-opening treatise on the subject, released in 2010.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(155) However, cyberterrorism is distinguishable from other forms of terrorism.
In October 2000, the Naval Postgraduate School hosted a conference to determine if terrorist groups would engage in cyberterrorism, Denning said.
Likewise, the interactions between terrorists and criminals who use computer technology may sometimes blur the distinction between cybercrime and cyberterrorism. So far, it remains difficult to determine the sources responsible for most of the annoying, yet increasingly sophisticated attacks that plague the Internet.
Respondents believe one way for average Americans to deal more effectively with bioterrorism, nuclear terrorism and cyberterrorism is to boost their own science knowledge and literacy.
As virus writers have grown increasingly deft at disguising and disseminating such computer bugs, the federal government has recognized the need to train workers to counter cyberterrorism, and community colleges are enlisting in the fight.
The multi-national drills aim to coordinate the response of partner forces to new risks such as terrorism, cyberterrorism and trans-border crimes, he added.
"The baton has been passed on to Russia and they have already informed that there will be 90 events and 90 documents to highlight, as President Putin also highlighted in his speech, that they will focus again on areas like cyberterrorism which is very important to them, cooperation in IT and digitisation as well as marking 75 years of second world war celebrations amongst other areas," she said.
(An entirely unwarranted, and still pending, FIR against the journalist Shahzeb Jillani accuses him of cyberterrorism.)
This impact would be significantly amplified if more corporates adopted sustainable business approaches.CYBERCRIMEThird, the private sector is the first line of defence in cyberterrorism.
In a 2012 article titled "The Cyber Terror Bogeyman," Peter Singer explained that fear and perceptions of the cyberterrorist threat often blur the realities of terrorist capabilities, at least in part because of elusive conceptions of the term "cyberterrorism." (1) While the Federal Bureau of Investigation offers a relatively specific definition that is predicated on select efforts that result in violence, (a) other discussions of cyberterrorism tend to "sweep all sorts of nonviolent online mischief into the 'terror' bin." (2) This appears to result in the inflation of perceptions of cyberterrorism and the dangers it invites.
"The Russian parliamentarians are very interested in China's experience in the fight against corruption, cyberterrorism, identification and prevention of cross-border crime using the Internet," he said.