information warfare

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information warfare

Also called "cyberterrorism" and "cyberwarfare," it refers to creating havoc by disrupting the computers that manage stock exchanges, power grids, air traffic control, telecommunications and defense systems. The traditional viruses, Trojans and denial of service attacks are part of the arsenal, all aimed at disrupting a government rather than a company. See virus, Trojan and denial of service attack.

Information warfare is increasingly the first offensive move before the start of a physical attack. The military in many countries have full-time cyberwarriors on the payroll, because the more successful a cyberattack on an early warning defense system, the greater the success of the real attack. For example, according to the book "Cyber War," North Korea may have as many as a thousand hackers stationed in China, working on knocking out systems in South Korea and other countries.

The first book to deal with the subject was "Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway," written by Winn Schwartau in 1994. Cited above, "Cyber War," by Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake is an eye-opening treatise on the subject, released in 2010.
References in periodicals archive ?
Applying the passive personality doctrine to cyberterrorism would therefore engender infinite and competing claims for prescriptive jurisdiction.
Cyberterrorism, described in the poll as "the use of computers to cause disruption or fear in society," is the only one of the six potential threats in the poll seen as more of a threat now than when Gallup last asked about it.
We are all aware, as well as concerned, about the emergence of ever-evolving new patterns and trend in international terrorism and violent extremism particularly cyberterrorism and criminality on and via cyberspace," underlined the statement.
According to him, among the many future threats, cyberterrorism is the most threatening, because terrorists would be able to use computer network devices to sabotage critical national infrastructures such as energy, transportation and government operations.
Limiting all intrusions would be impossible, but one could start with cybercrime and cyberterrorism.
2) Leon Panetta, while serving as Secretary of Defense, singled out cyberterrorism as posing a dire threat to such targets.
In our feature, "Cybersecurity: You've Been Hacked," we look at the tangled web at the crossroads of privacy and cyberterrorism.
While a larger stage for facility failure than the Super Bowl's power outage is hard to imagine, life safety risks are amped up for all FMs these days--including terrorism (the FBI investigated the Super Bowl incident to ensure there had been no foul plays), cyberterrorism, workplace violence, and suspect parcels.
But cyberterrorism has yet to truly disrupt our lives in a way that galvanizes government, utilities and companies around investing in better safeguards.
More than a decade later, he still rejected the word cyberterrorism on the basis that it is a red herring that "conjure[s] up images of Bin Ladin waging war from his cave"; he did, however, caution that there may be such a term as cyberterrorism in the future.
In the contemporary security environment another form of cyber activity has dominated attention: cyberterrorism.
Bulgariaas State Agency for National Security (DANS) has decided to increase the number of computer experts in order to improve the efforts for combating cyberterrorism.