Cyclomorphosis

cyclomorphosis

[‚sī·klō′mȯr·fə·səs]
(ecology)
Cyclic recurrent polymorphism in certain planktonic fauna in response to seasonal temperature or salinity changes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyclomorphosis

 

the succession of different generations of individuals of the same species caused by seasonal differences in living conditions. Cyclomorphosis is studied chiefly with reference to seasonal changes in the parthenogenetic generations of rotifers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Water fleas (Daphnia), a common zooplankton in lakes, go through a seasonal cycle of body forms called "cyclomorphosis." In the presence of chemicals released by predators, each generation grows energetically expensive spines called "helmets." (35) Back on the land, entomologists have noticed that tree leaves will toughen, becoming distasteful after the plant has been fed upon by herbivorous insects.
Cyclomorphosis in Daphnia lumholtzi induced by temperature.
The other side of cyclomorphosis: why Daphnia lose their helmets.
Such traits include cyclomorphosis and other dimorphisms associated with protective structures ("protective" dimorphisms), paedomorphosis, diapause, some cases of sex determination (e.g., in many species of reptiles and some fish), trophic dimorphisms (e.g., cannibalistic versus herbivorous morphs), pupal color (swallowtail butterflies), dimorphic variation in "weaponry" (e.g., horns and forceps in insects, tentacles in some species of hydroids), body size (e.g., "jacking" in salmon), and wing dimorphism in insects (for a review of these and other types of dimorphic variation, see Roff 1996a).
Circulating chemicals have also been implicated in cyclomorphosis (Jacobs 1980) and wing dimorphism in insects.
Rotifer population in a Southeast Texas oxbow lake with empahsis on cyclomorphosis of Keratella cochlearis.
1997), their morphological variations called cyclomorphosis and adaptations (Wetzel 2001) and their ability to feed on different food type.
The nature and causes of cyclomorphosis in a species of the Bosmina longirostris complex.
Cyclomorphosis in Daphnia galeata mendotae Birge and Daphnia retrocurva Forbes as a predator-inducedresponse.
Some aspects in the costs of cyclomorphosis in Daphnia cucullata.