Cyclopes


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Related to Cyclopes: Poseidon, Hecatoncheires, Hecatonchires

Cyclopes

 

in ancient Greek mythology, one-eyed giants. The Cyclopes were the sons of Uranus and Gaea. According to the most ancient beliefs, they forged the thunderbolt that Zeus used to overcome the Titans. Other accounts represent the Cyclopes as the assistants of the god Hephaestus in his forge. They were also represented as the builders of the mighty walls of Mycenae and Tiryns, which were constructed from huge rough rocks (cyclopean construction). According to the Odyssey, the Cyclopes were a wild cave-dwelling tribe that lived on a remote island somewhere in the west and did not recognize the authority of the gods. Polyphemus, who was blinded by Odysseus, was one of the Cyclopes.

Cyclopes

one-eyed, unruly giants; excellent metals craftsmen. [Gk. Myth.: Parrinder, 68]

Cyclopes

one-eyed monsters. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]

Cyclopes

race of one-eyed, gigantic men. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Sindbad the Sailor,” Third Voyage]

Cyclopes

Poseidon’s sons, each with one eye in the center of his forehead. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]

Cyclopes

one-eyed giants; builders of fortifications. [Gk. Myth.: Avery, 346]
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise, the myth of Apollo tending cattle, to which the Myron group alludes, refers indirectly to Apollo's slaying of the Cyclopes and the god's vengefulness is keenly felt in myths depicted on the two ivory door panels.
Rather, as if hurled from the air by a party of Cyclopes, they were smashing into one neighborhood after another, knocking buildings to the ground.
2) For instance, Klarer comments that cannibalism appears in the description of the island of the Cyclopes in Book IX of the Odyssey (392).
The Cyclopes did no work, and as a consequence had no proper polis, hence no proper guest ethic.
6) Thus, for example, Aristotle's vision of humanity with and without civilization is profoundly informed by the Homeric tableaux of the lives of the Cyclopes, Calypso, Circe, and the Phaiacians.
As Homer sang, 'For among the Cyclopes, the earth, giver of grain, bears the rich clusters of wine, and the rain of Zeus gives them increase; but this is a draught from a stream of ambrosia and nectar' (Odyssey IX.
27) and subsequently notes the lack of ship-building among the Cyclopes (9.
Cyclopes quoque eadem India gignit;et dictos Cyclopes eo quod unum habere oculum in fronte media perhibentur.
Buchan illustrates how the Cyclops of The Odyssey is a manifestation of a monster, different from a human like Achilles, until he desires help from the other Cyclopes.
Especially noteworthy in Odysseus' story of the Cyclopes is his open acknowledgment of a tradition that draws such an unflattering portrait.