Cyclorama


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cyclorama

[¦sī·klə′räm·ə]
(graphic arts)
A vertical surface, often curved, used to form the background for theatrical settings; an illusion of depth is achieved by even lighting.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyclorama

 

a type of spatial, or plastic, art. A cyclorama consists of a ribbon-like picture, stretched over the inside surface of a cylindrical frame and combined with an assortment of objects—including structures and real objects—which are arranged in a circle in front of it. It depends for its effect on special lighting. Usually housed in a special building with a round hall, it is viewed from a platform in the center of the room. Because cycloramas create the illusion of real space, encircling the viewer in the manner of a horizon, they are used primarily to represent events occurring over a sizable area with a large number of participants.

The first cyclorama was created in Edinburgh at the end of the 18th century by the Irish painter R. Barker. Cycloramas, usually of battle scenes, became widespread in the 19th century. The most important cycloramas in Russia were created by the painter F. A. Rubo. His Siege of Sevastopol’ (1902–04) opened in Sevastopol’ (1902-04) in 1905. It was badly damaged during the 1941–42 siege of Sevastopol’ but was restored and reopened in 1954. The Battle of Borodino, painted in 1911, opened in Moscow in 1912 and again in 1962. The Soviet painters M. B. Grekov, G. K. Savit-skii, P. P. Sokolov-Skalia, and N. G. Kotov have all worked on cycloramas.

REFERENCE

Petropavlovskii, V. Iskusstvo panoram i dioram. Kiev, 1965.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cyclorama

A curved backdrop at the rear of a theater stage, sometimes extending around to the proscenium arch in a U-shape; usually painted to simulate the sky.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is especially surprising given his pioneering investment in hypertext and in immersive, virtual Cave technology where you make the decisions, you move around, as in the aforementioned historical cycloramas, where the viewer would position himself, often on a raised platform, squarely at the centre of the painting.
The Cyclorama offers visitors a unique experience of the battle with its three dimensional diorama, surround sound, lighting and narration.
The cyclorama that lay upstage was next lit to evoke a midday seascape for the box-tree scene and the wooden decking floor became an imagined beach as Maria and Sirs Toby and Andrew hid behind a windbreak upstage left prior to Malvolio's entrance.
The Gettysburg Cyclorama, measuring 377 feet by 42 feet, is a monument to Pickett's Charge, the heroic, but failed, charge by Confederate Gen.
Physically reminiscent of a Victorian cyclorama, the cylinder has animated lights on the exterior shell which signal when each camera is about to take a picture.
Physically reminiscent of a Victorian cyclorama, The O2 Memory Project is a 10 foot high cylinder with 11 cameras placed equidistance around its perimeter.
As an indigo cyclorama brightened to dawn-pink, the dancers woke from stillness into movement.
Experiencing a cyclorama (a large mural that tells a story on walls that encircle a room) was also seminal because it "epitomized the end of a type of moving picture making--movies were around the corner--and, like movies, was second-class, overwrought, exhibiting no complexity and not large-scale enough to overwhelm and encompass you.
Other history museums and attractions include the Atlanta History Center, the Atlanta Cyclorama and Civil War Museum (a huge painting and diorama in-the-round, with a rotating central audience platform, that depicts the Battle of Atlanta in the Civil War), the Carter Center and Presidential Library, historic house museum Rhodes Hall, and the Margaret Mitchell House and Museum.
No cyclorama, emphasis is No cyclorama emphasis is on the 3 dimensional skein on the characters with 3 doors and later relationship to the world.
The private world we can create with books could be an artistic and intellectual cyclorama. It can be as narrow and focused or as broad and varied as our taste require.
Located in Grant Park, The Cyclorama was originally commissioned by Civil War General John "Blackjack" Logan to further his postwar political agenda.