cyclosporin A


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Related to cyclosporin A: methotrexate, tacrolimus, Statins

cyclosporin A

[¦sī·klə‚spȯr·ən ′ā]
(biochemistry)
A cyclic peptide produced by some fungi. It inactivates helper T cells, making it useful as an immunosuppressive drug, especially in the prevention of graft rejection in transplantation surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tacrolimus is a macrolide antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces tsucrenaenseis, which is 10 to 100 times more potent in vitro than cyclosporin A. Tacrolimus binds to a specific immunophilin, FK506, and its mechanism of action resembles that of cyclosporin (MOORE, 2004).
Patients unresponsive to traditional therapy with cyclosporin A or other topical drugs for at least 8 weeks might benefit from transposition of the parotid salivary gland duct (GELATT & GELATT, 2001).
These NIAMS researchers hope that cyclosporin A will soon be an important addition to the list.
Simultaneous and rapid analysis of cyclosporin A and creatinine in finger prick blood samples using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and its application in C2 monitoring.
High-throughput analysis of everolimus (RAD001) and cyclosporin A (CsA) in whole blood by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using a semi-automated 96-well solid-phase extraction system.
Microscale high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry assay for cyclosporin A in blood.
To evaluate the influence of immunosuppressive regimens, especially glucocorticoids, on serum cystatin C, 20 clinically stable patients on immunosuppression therapy with low-dose glucocorticoids were matched with 20 clinically stable patients receiving cyclosporin A alone and 20 clinically stable patients receiving cyclosporin A together with azathioprine (Table 1).
The development of cadaver kidney harvesting techniques expanded the availability of kidneys for transplantation and increased the percentage of successful kidney transplants utilizing a cadaver donor from 56 percent in 1967 to 79 percent in 1987.1 Part of the success was due to the FDA approval in 1983 of cyclosporin as an immunosuppressive and antirejection drug.