Cyme


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Cyme

(sī`mē), ancient Greek city of W Asia Minor, on the Ionian Sea and N of the present Smyrna in W Asian Turkey. It was the largest and most important of the 12 cities of Aeolis. In the late 5th cent. B.C., Cyme struggled to be free of Persian domination but was only intermittently successful. Later it was a city of the Seleucids and ultimately of Rome.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyme

 

an inflorescence in the course of whose development each axis terminates in a flower and ceases to grow early. The lateral axes, that is, the branches of the inflorescence, outgrow the cyme. There may be a single lateral axis (monochasium), two lateral axes (dichasium), or more than two lateral axes (pleiochasium), all of which terminate in a flower.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cyme

[sīm]
(botany)
An inflorescence in which each main axis terminates in a single flower; secondary and tertiary axes may also have flowers, but with shorter flower stalks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cyme

an inflorescence in which the first flower is the terminal bud of the main stem and subsequent flowers develop as terminal buds of lateral stems
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Any arrangement of more than one flower on a stem, for example, corymb, cyme, and panicle.
A monochasial cyme, or monochasium (MON-oh-kay-zee-um), has one division (see Figure 9-12).
There are three flowers in a cyme of Betula, two of which are close to the primary bract while the third one is located between the first two (Fig.
Inflorescences axillary, 5-25 mm x 8-13 mm, cymose, glomerules secund, on shoots to 3.5 cm long, 0.8 mm wide; primary cyme with four bracts subtending flower pair.
Description: Tiny, waxy, orange flowers appear in rounded, umbellate cyme clusters.
"So anyone concerned about leading needs to start by asking the question, CyWhat am I?' Are you all about Cyme, me, me'?
I think that's because it's hard for most of us to come to grips with the fact that "it's not all about me," especially if has been all about Cyme' until recently.
In the race between Clazomenae and Cyme, the plurality of runners is explained by the requirement to offer a sacrifice at the boundary: Diodorus 15.
Capitulescences a dichotomous cyme; capitula pedunculate, homogamous, discoid; receptacle paleaceous, paleae embracing all the florets; involucre one- to two-seriate.
FLOWER DESCRIPTION: White, 1" florets forming a round 6" to 10" snowball-like cyme. Flowers in May.
As similarities were seen among the kinds of inflorescences described, attempts to "classify" inflorescences (i.e., raceme, cyme, etc.) were made.