Cynomorium

Cynomorium

 

a genus of plants of the family Cynomoriaceae (sometimes included in the family Balanophoraceae). The plants are perennial, achlorophyllous, red-brown or violet-brown herbaceous parasites with a branched rhizome. The stems are fleshy, with numerous scaly leaves. The small unisexual and bisexual flowers are in clusters gathered into dense claviform or cylindrical apical spikes with thick axes. The purple-black corolla is one- to five-parted (sometimes with as many as six to eight parts). There is a single stamen; the fruit is nutlike.

There are two species—C. coccineum and C. songaricum — distributed in the Mediterranean region, Southwest Asia, Middle Asia, and Central Asia. The plants grow in steppes and semides-erts, predominantly on sandy saline soils. C. songaricum occurs in the USSR, in the Balkhash region, Tien-Shan, and Pamir-Alai. It parasitizes the roots of shrubs (for example, the tamarisk, Nitraria, and buckthorn) and, less commonly, herbaceous plants.

References in periodicals archive ?
Miao et al., "The genus Cynomorium in China: an ethnopharmacological and phytochemical review," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
Rong et al., "Therapeutic effects of radix dipsaci, pyrola herb, and Cynomorium songaricum on bone metabolism of ovariectomized rats," BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol.
demonstrated that compounds from Cynomorium songaricum (CS) exhibited phytoestrogenic and phytoandrogenic activities using MCF-7 or LNCaP cells and HeLa or AD293 cells, which may contribute to inhibiting the oestrogen/androgen-induced BPH development.
Calcification of the collagenous axial skeleton of Veretillum cynomorium pall.
Hattori, "Flavan-3-ol contents, anti-oxidative and [alpha]-glucosidase inhibitory activities of Cynomorium songaricum," Food Chemistry, vol.
Another herb, cynomorium, has been found to increase telomere length; and hu zhang contains resveratrol, which activates telomerase.
Jun 1835.--Type: Cynomorium L.; Cynomoriaceae Endl.
The many plants eaten include the Malta mushroom (not a fungus, but the parasite Cynomorium coccineum, Balanophoraceae), which is greatly appreciated as a condiment.
Nieddu et al., "Biological activities and nutraceutical potentials of water extracts from different parts of Cynomorium coccineum L.
One morphologically unusual desert plant is Cynomorium soongaricum (some authors even create a special family for it, the Cynomoriaceae), famous for its delicious taste.