cytotoxic T cell

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cytotoxic T cell

[¦sīd·ə‚täk·sik ′tē ‚sel]
(immunology)
A type of T cell which protects against pathogens that invade host cell cytoplasm, where they cannot be bound by antibodies, by recognizing and killing the host cell before the pathogens can proliferate and escape.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, the investigators examined the NK cell cytoskeleton (the part of each cell primarily responsible for the spatial organization of its components) during target cell killing in comparison to that of cytotoxic T cells. Both of these immune system cells release toxic molecules through a highly regulated process controlled by receptors attached to them.
The researchers were working at the John Curtin School of Medical Research in Canberra, Australia, in the early 1970s when they began to study how genetic variability influences the response of cytotoxic T cells.
Factors responsible for this relative resistance to infection and disease include cytotoxic T cells, neutralizing antibodies, high concentrations of certain chemokines (e.g., RANTES, MIP-1), human leukocyte antigen haplotype, mannose-binding protein, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, C4, and TAP polymorphism (2-4).
They had known about T helper cells, so called because they prod other lymphocytes to act, and cytotoxic T cells, which attack and destroy undesirable cells.
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