Cyzicus


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Cyzicus

(sĭz`ĭkəs), ancient city, NW Turkey, at the neck of the Cyzicus Peninsula. Strategically located, it rivaled Byzantium in commercial importance. Founded (756 B.C.) by Greek colonists from Miletus, it was a member of the Delian League. In 410 B.C., Alcibiades defeated a Spartan fleet off Cyzicus, and in 74 B.C. the city withstood a siege by Mithradates VI of Pontus. As a reward for its loyalty, it became a free city under Roman rule. In A.D. 675 the town was pillaged by the Arabs and then used as a base for a siege of Constantinople. There are ruins of a large temple built by Roman Emperor Hadrian and of other public buildings.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cyzicus

 

(Greek, Kyzikos), an ancient Greek city on the southern shore of Propontis (Sea of Marmara), founded in the eighth or seventh century B.C. by colonists from Miletus. Cyzicus was one of the large commercial centers of antiquity. Its coins were widespread in the ancient world from the seventh to the fourth century B.C. The city belonged to the Delian League. Alcibiades was victorious over the Spartans in 410 B.C. at Cyzicus. The city was finally conquered by the Romans in A.D. 25. Beginning with Diocletian’s reign, Cyzicus was the capital of the province of Hellespont. The city was destroyed in 544 by an earthquake.

REFERENCE

Hasluck, F. W. Cyzicus. Cambridge, 1910.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cyzicus

an ancient Greek colony in NW Asia Minor on the S shore of the Sea of Marmara: site of Alcibiades' naval victory over the Peloponnesians (410 bc)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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(84) Apollodorus of Cyzicus, Phanosthenes of Andros and Heraclides of Clazomenae.
THE CLAM SHRIMP CYZICUS MEXICANUS (BRANCHIOPODA, DIPLOSTRACA), A NEW SPECIES REPORT FOR ALABAMA, KEVIN J.
22:22), Bavli Menahot 85a, and Exodus Rabbah 9.7; (3) the reference in Jude 9 to the archangel Michael's disputing with the Devil about the body of Moses, which is not narrated in the Bible but is said by Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and the fifth-century church historian Gelasius of Cyzicus to have come from a work called the Assumption of Moses, which may be an earlier version of the work preserved partially in Latin known as the Testament of Moses; (15) and (4) the quotation of Enoch's prophecy in Jude 14-15, known from the pseudepigraphic work 1 Enoch 1:9.
(4) Further, just as Sinope's proximity to the Crimea favored its maritime prosperity within the Euxine, currents promoted the sites of Cyzicus and Perinthus.
The democratic revolutionaries "continued to need a great deal of money to carry on the war, and while the treasury was almost empty, the revival of Athenian power and prestige after Cyzicus promised to generate income.
BALIKESIR, Jul 8, 2010 (TUR) -- Archaeological excavations have begun in the ancient city of Cyzicus near Erdek town of the northwestern province of Balikesir.
He used Cyzicus mexicanus and was the first to obtain trackways made, under water, on a mud-silt sediment mixture for the substrate.
Basil of Caesarea, his classmate Gregory of Nazianzus, Basil's younger brother Gregory of Nyssa, and Aetius's student Eunomius of Cyzicus, whom pro-Nicene leaders accused of dangerously adapting the (already "heretical") teachings of Arius, all came from Cappadocia and gained ecclesiastical authority in the later fourth century.
88-136 Theodosius II or Valentinian III (425-450), mint of Cyzicus (Williams and Zervos 1989, no.
Among the arthropods, only the conchostracan Cyzicus hierosolymitanus [9] has hemoglobin with higher affinity (P50 = 0.035 mmHg at 28[degrees]C and pH 7.2, Table 1).